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INVASION
OF THE
DINOSAURS

BY
MALCOLM
HULKE

PART THREE


1: EXT. POWER SUB-STATION

(The DOCTOR suddenly spins round as he hears a loud roar behind him. A Tyrannosaurus has been materialised and looms over the DOCTOR. He swiftly aims his stun-gun at it and tries firing again and again but with no result.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Fire!

(The troops start to launch the grenades at the new arrival as it swoops down towards the DOCTOR. The DOCTOR fires again but once more without effect. He tries to make a run for it, ducking under the railings but an explosion from a grenade is too close and it knocks him forward and slightly stuns him. He staggers forward and falls at a safe distance from any more grenades.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Fire!

(YATES draws his pistol and runs forward.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (To the soldiers.) ___ Captain Yates!

(The DOCTOR watches dazed as YATES, immediately under the Tyrannosaurus reaches out for the stun gun. He takes the disc off the front and aims upwards at the reptile. He fires and the gun buzzes. The Tyrannosaurus' eyes start to flicker as the shot takes effect. YATES gets up and runs over to the DOCTOR. They watch as the dinosaur collapses in an unconscious heap on the ground.)


2: INT. CONTROL ROOM

(Some time later, a furious YATES has returned to the control room and taps the returned disc in front of an unfazed WHITAKER.)

CAPTAIN YATES: You tried to murder him! You deliberately materialised a savage monster knowing it would attack him!
BUTLER: An unavoidable mistake.
CAPTAIN YATES: Oh, that was no mistake. I warned you I wouldn't have the Doctor harmed.
BUTLER: Well, you sabotaged the stun gun.
CAPTAIN YATES: I agreed to delay his experiments - not to kill him!
BUTLER: Captain Yates, may I remind you - you were the one who said he was such a danger to us.

(YATES turns to a brooding WHITAKER and pleads.)

CAPTAIN YATES: Let me tell him everything, explain to him what we're trying to do? He'll be sympathetic. He might even help us.
PROFESSOR WHITAKER: No, that's out of the question.
BUTLER: If he doesn't agree with us, what happens then?
CAPTAIN YATES: There's no need to kill him.
PROFESSOR WHITAKER: He must be delayed. Now once the temporal energy has dispersed, the creature will return to its own time...and the Doctor's instruments will lead him straight to us. Now what stage has he reached?
CAPTAIN YATES: They've taken the creature to a hanger on the fringe of the zone.
BUTLER: Then you'd, er, better get over there, Captain Yates.
CAPTAIN YATES: To do what?
BUTLER: Er, more sabotage, I'm afraid.

(Angrily, YATES turns to walk out.)

BUTLER: All you have to do is to ensure that the Doctor's instruments don't function. The creature will return to its own time, the Doctor will learn nothing and we shall have the delay we need.
CAPTAIN YATES: And the Doctor won't be harmed?
PROFESSOR WHITAKER: Of course not.

(YATES considers.)

CAPTAIN YATES: I'll do what I can.

(YATES almost runs out leaving a brooding WHITAKER.)

PROFESSOR WHITAKER: I'm not satisfied with that young man's loyalty. He's far too concerned about this precious Doctor of his.


3: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER

(The Tyrannosaurus Rex lies on its side in the hanger, held down by heavy chains. Its massive bulk gently moves in and out as it breathes. Around it, on stands, are a number of sensors being put in place by the DOCTOR. His work finished, he walks into a side office.)


4: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER OFFICE

(Here the BRIGADIER and SARAH wait. Through a set of observation windows, they can look out on the sleeping dinosaur.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: All set up then, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yes, I think so.

(He looks out of the window at the Tyrannosaurus.)

DOCTOR: Mind you, that creature isn't what I wanted at all. What I really wanted was a Brontosaurus.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: What's the difference?
DOCTOR: The difference, Brigadier, is that the Brontosaurus is a placid vegetarian, whereas the Tyrannosaurus is the largest and fiercest flesh eater ever known on your planet.
SARAH: It will stay asleep, won't it, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yes, for a while.

(He sits at a desk on which he has placed the small console of his monitoring equipment.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Don't you worry, Miss Smith, those chains will hold him down.

(He sits at another desk at right angles to the DOCTOR'S.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Well, Doctor, now what do we do?
DOCTOR: Oh, we sit back and wait for it to dematerialise.
SARAH: Then perhaps I can have your attention?
DOCTOR: Carry on, Sarah, I'm all ears.

(Nevertheless he continues working.)

SARAH: Well I've been checking up into this whole question of time travel...
DOCTOR: Well then, you should have come to me. I know all about time travel.
SARAH: Ah, I know you know about it, but what I'm interested in, Doctor, is other people who know about it.
DOCTOR: Oh, are there any?
SARAH: Oh, one or two have dabbled.
DOCTOR: Oh, fascinating. The trouble is the Blinovitch limitation effect. If they could overcome that they're problem's ___...
SARAH: (Interrupts.) I think someone has.

(The DOCTOR looks at her.)

DOCTOR: What - on this planet?
SARAH: (Tuts.) This is the only one I've been able to check up on, Doctor!
DOCTOR: Oh, yes, yes, of course. Er, let's see now, there was this, er, there was this Chinese scientist called Chun Sen - oh, hang about, he hasn't been born yet, has he?

(SARAH interrupts quickly again.)

SARAH: Quite, but there is a man called Whitaker. Now he's the leading scientist in this field.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Whitaker - that name rings a bell.
SARAH: He claimed to have developed a workable theory of time travel.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: I remember - he applied for a big government grant. It was refused.
DOCTOR: Oh, why?
SARAH: Well, Whitaker was always an outsider, always mixed up in quarrels with other scientists. No one believed his theory would work.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Yes, that's right. All the government scientific advisors said the fellow was a crank. Well what about him?
SARAH: He's disappeared.

(Both men sit up with interest.)

DOCTOR: Has he indeed?
SARAH: About six months ago, he completely vanished. I checked with my newspaper contacts up north - no trace.
DOCTOR: And you think he could be behind all this?
SARAH: Well, it's a possibility. He was a brilliant scientist, and he must have been bitterly disappointed when the government refused that grant.
DOCTOR: You could be right, Sarah. It's worth checking up on.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Yes, I'll get on to it. Intelligence records may have something on him.
DOCTOR: Yeah, I'd like to see the application for that grant - see the man's working papers.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Right, they must be on file somewhere.

(He heads for the door which leads outside the hanger.)

DOCTOR: Oh, Brigadier, have your fellows brought the TARDIS back to UNIT HQ for me yet?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Yes, should be there by now.
DOCTOR: Could you give me a run down there?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Yes, of course.
DOCTOR: Good, thanks, there's one or two things inside I think I might need.

(He gets up and picks up his cloak.)

SARAH: Oh, what about your little pet out there?
DOCTOR: Oh, he'll be alright for a while. (To the BRIGADIER.) Have you placed guards?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: General Finch has lent me a squad.
DOCTOR: Good.
SARAH: But suppose it dematerialises while you're not here?
DOCTOR: Then my instruments will obtain the necessary readings. Coming?
SARAH: Yes, yes.

(The DOCTOR strides out.)

SARAH: Er, Brigadier?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Mmm?
SARAH: Can I bring a camera back here with me?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Whatever for?
SARAH: Well, for my story. I'm a journalist, remember? You don't think I'm going to miss an opportunity like this?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: I am sorry, Miss Smith. This whole affair's under strict security black-out. You can take your photographs when the crisis is passed.

(He walks out, once more leaving a frustrated SARAH behind.)

SARAH: Oh! When the crisis is passed, there won't be anything to photograph!

(With a last look at the Tyrannosaurus she leaves. After a moment, the door opens from the hanger itself and CAPTAIN YATES enters. He moves over to the DOCTOR'S monitoring equipment.)


5: INT. SCHOOL SCIENCE LABORATORY

(The DOCTOR has returned to the science laboratory at the school. The TARDIS has been placed in the corner. The BRIGADIER has shown GROVER and FINCH into the room where the DOCTOR and SARAH are. She has discarded her brown jacket and wears a black leather one instead. She is writing her notes for her story.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: The Minister has some information for you, Doctor - about this elusive fellow Whitaker.
DOCTOR: Have you, sir?
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: I was chairman of the committee that considered his application for a government grant.
DOCTOR: So you've seen his working papers?
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Oh, yes, not that I understood them, of course, but my scientific colleagues on the committee assured me that they were utter nonsense.
DOCTOR: Oh, so you don't think that he could be behind what's been happening here?
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Oh, out of the question. I'm afraid the poor fellow's just a harmless crank.
SARAH: Oh, that's not what I've heard, Minister. According to my sources he's a brilliant scientist.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: May I ask what are your sources?
SARAH: His colleagues at Oxford, the science correspondent of "The Times" and the editor of "Nature".
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: He may be brilliant at other fields, Miss Smith, but as far as his time travel theory is concerned, I was assured it's worthless.

(He turns to the DOCTOR, leaving a SARAH annoyed at her contribution once more being ignored.)

CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Doctor, I understand that you have set up an experiment which may give us the answer to all this?
DOCTOR: Yeah, well, it's a possibility, Minister, but I can't guarantee it.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: I'd be very interested to hear about it.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Well, why don't we go to my office, sir? It'll be more comfortable there.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Thank you very much.
DOCTOR: That's a good idea.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: General Finch?
GENERAL FINCH: I must be getting back to HQ, sir.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: This way, sir.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Thank you.

(The BRIGADIER leads the DOCTOR and GROVER out, leaving SARAH alone with FINCH. He picks up his cap and gloves to leave.)

SARAH: Isn't it marvellous! The one real clue to this whole business and they totally ignore it.

(FINCH puts his cap and gloves down. He seems to unbend a little towards SARAH.)

GENERAL FINCH: I'm interested, Miss Smith. Where is this fellow, Whitaker?
SARAH: Well, that's just it, you see. No one knows.
GENERAL FINCH: No one?
SARAH: He vanished about six months ago. Just upped and left home.
GENERAL FINCH: Well, people do disappear, change their names, start a new life for themselves...
SARAH: No, it's too big a coincidence. I'm not going to let go of this.
GENERAL FINCH: Well, what can you do?
SARAH: Keep looking until I find him. I'll make them believe me!

(FINCH smiles.)

SARAH: The Brigadier's being completely uncooperative. He wouldn't even let me get some photographs of that monster they've got chained down.
GENERAL FINCH: Well, you've got a pass, haven't you?
SARAH: Oh! I tried! When I got back there, they wouldn't let me in - said I had to have a special pass.
GENERAL FINCH: Special army pass from my HQ.
SARAH: Er, you couldn't give me a pass, could you? Oh, I wouldn't publish anything until it was all over and I got proper permission.
GENERAL FINCH: Oh, don't carry passes about with me, you know?

(He thinks, smiles again and picks up a notepad.)

GENERAL FINCH: Look, take this to my HQ.

(He takes a pen out of his pocket and starts to write.)

GENERAL FINCH: See my adjutant. He'll fix you up.
SARAH: (Delighted.) Oh, that's marvellous! Where is your HQ?

(FINCH carries on writing.)

GENERAL FINCH: Show this to my driver. He'll take you there.
SARAH: Oh, what about you?

(He passes her the note.)

GENERAL FINCH: I've got one or two things to settle here.
SARAH: Thank you.

(She grabs her bag and leaves. FINCH watches her go and smiles...)


6: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER

(YATES walks into the main body of the hanger, towards the stunned dinosaur. Its mouth lies open showing its huge teeth as it roars gently in its sleep.)


7: INT. SCHOOL SCIENCE LABORATORY

(The DOCTOR and the BRIGADIER go back into the science laboratory from their meeting with GROVER. The DOCTOR opens a series of bottles, examining pills within them.)

DOCTOR: What a charming fellah. You know, it's lucky for you, Brigadier, that somebody with some sense is in charge of this operation.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Unfortunately General Finch is in charge of the military side.
DOCTOR: Yes, quite. Where's Sarah?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Maybe General Finch took her out to dinner?
DOCTOR: Hmm! Didn't look like the beginnings of a beautiful friendship to me.

(The BRIGADIER smiles and starts to leave by the other door.)

DOCTOR: Oh, by the way, Brigadier? I've got to get down to the hanger. Can you lend me a jeep?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Yes.

(He comes back into the room and picks up a phone.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Into phone.) Er, Brigadier speaking - lay on a jeep for the Doctor, will you? Oh, and did you see Miss Smith leave here? (He listens.) Oh, thank you.

(He puts the phone down.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: She went off in the General's car.

(The DOCTOR raises his eyebrows...)

DOCTOR: Oh?


8: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER OFFICE

(With a case of camera equipment, SARAH bustles into the hanger office. She looks out of the window at the sleeping monster and smiles. She goes back to the case and takes out a camera with a flashgun attached to it. Putting the strap of the camera over her neck, she goes to the observation window, aims and takes a picture.)


9: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER

(Within the main body of the hanger, another flash from the camera causes the eyelids of the Tyrannosaurus to move back. Its head moves slightly and it blinks as another flash hits it.)


10: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER OFFICE

(SARAH checks her camera, adjusts her position and takes another picture. She thinks for a second and then moves through the second door into the hanger.)


11: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER

(The monster's breathing is becoming more pronounced as SARAH walks up to it and aims the lens once more. SARAH takes several more shots of the bulk of the dinosaur's body, thus missing the signs of its rapid recovery. SARAH kneels down to change her film as behind her the Tyrannosaurus tries to rise. The chains easily give way and their clanking alters SARAH to the danger. She screams and runs back towards the office as the Tyrannosaurus roars.)


12: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER OFFICE

(SARAH runs through the office and makes for the second door as the dinosaur roars even louder. She finds the door has been locked shut from the other side. She bangs on the door.)


13: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER

(The Tyrannosaurus rises fully upwards.)


14: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER OFFICE

(SARAH turns and sees the monster roaring through the window at her.)


15: EXT. ROAD

(The DOCTOR drives himself in a jeep past some abandoned industrial units. He turns a corner into a deserted residential road.)


16: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER OFFICE

(The Tyrannosaurus continues to roar through the window at SARAH. She again bangs on the door.)

SARAH: (Shouts.) Help! Someone! Open the door! Help! Open the door! ___!

(She looks at the monster. It seems to turn and she presses herself into the corner of the door, trying to put herself out of sight.)


17: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER

(The Tyrannosaurus' tail swings round, hitting the walls of the office.)


18: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER OFFICE

(SARAH screams and starts to bang on the door again.)

SARAH: (Shouts.) Help! Someone please!

(The tail swings again hitting the window frame.)

SARAH: Help me! I can't get out! The door's stuck! Help me!

(The tail swings again and the glass and frame cave in. The shock causes a lintel above the door also to fall onto SARAH'S head. She falls to the floor unconscious as the dinosaur pokes its massive head through the destroyed window frame. The door to the office opens and the DOCTOR comes in as SARAH starts to come round. He grabs her arm to yank her to her feet.)

DOCTOR: Come on, up! Come on!

(SARAH is almost sobbing as he leads her from the room.)

DOCTOR: Come on, get up, that's it!


19: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER

(Its meal departed, the Tyrannosaurus rears fully upwards, dislodging some of the girders in the room.)


20: EXT. HANGER

(The DOCTOR half drags SARAH with him as he runs at full pace along the edge of the hanger and towards his jeep.)


21: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER

(The Tyrannosaurus dislodges more of the roof girders.)


22: EXT. HANGER

(The DOCTOR and SARAH carry on running. SARAH is only just managing to stay on her feet.)


23: INT. AIRCRAFT HANGER

(The Tyrannosaurus moves forward.)


24: EXT. HANGER

(The two reach the jeep. The DOCTOR puts SARAH into the passenger seat. As he runs to the driver's seat, SARAH dizzily puts a hand to her bruised head. She is fully woken as the brick-walled side of the hanger suddenly bursts outwards as the Tyrannosaurus tries to break out of the building. Its head and torso emerging, it roars down at the two as the DOCTOR starts to jeep up.)


25: INT. SCHOOL SCIENCE LABORATORY

(Having made it safely back to the school, the DOCTOR puts a compress on SARAH'S head. She is very shaken. The BRIGADIER watches.)

DOCTOR: Well, it's a nasty bump. Nothing too serious. How do you feel?
SARAH: (Scared.) Do you realise - somebody tried to kill me?!
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Quietly.) I don't want to seem unsympathetic Miss Smith, but you have only got yourself to blame.
SARAH: Well somebody locked that door so I couldn't get out.
DOCTOR: Well, she's right, you know, Brigadier - that door was bolted on the outside.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Maybe one of the soldiers didn't realise she was in there?

(BENTON comes into the room with another soldier who carries the console of the DOCTOR'S monitoring equipment.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Here we are, Doctor. Hasn't been knocked about too much.
DOCTOR: Thanks, Sergeant. Put it down there, will you?

(The soldier places the console on the lab bench indicated and the DOCTOR immediately starts to look over it.)

DOCTOR: When the creature vanished, it was still in the electrical force-field, Brigadier, so we should learn something.

(BENTON goes over to the BRIGADIER and holds up the chains from the hanger.)

SERGEANT BENTON: We found this, sir.

(One of the links has plainly been cut through. The BRIGADIER takes it and starts to look over it.)

SERGEANT BENTON: They were all like that - cut clean through.

(The DOCTOR turns round from his console.)

DOCTOR: And this machine's been sabotaged. There's not a single reading.

(Realising the implications, the BRIGADIER calls over to the soldier who came in with BENTON.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Dismissed!

(The soldier walks out and BENTON starts to follow.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: No, not you, Benton.

(The DOCTOR waits for the departing soldier to shut the door.)

DOCTOR: Well, at least we've learnt something, Brigadier - somebody inside this organisation is working against us.
SERGEANT BENTON: Yes, but what I can't understand, sir, is why should anyone want to cut those chains?
DOCTOR: It was a deliberate attempt on Sarah's life.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Why should anybody want to kill her?
SERGEANT BENTON: They were probably after you, Doctor. I mean, they expected you to go back there.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Yes, of course, that'll be it. Well, Doctor, any suggestions?
DOCTOR: Yes, I shall build another detector.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: We haven't got to capture another dinosaur?
DOCTOR: No, no. No, this time I'm going to try something different. I'm going to build a portable device to detect that power source.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Well why didn't you do that in the first place?
DOCTOR: Because, Brigadier, it cannot be as accurate or as powerful as this would have been. But it could give us the general direction.
SARAH: Doctor? Exactly how much energy would be needed to make these things appear?
DOCTOR: Oh, something like a small nuclear generator.
SARAH: Then why don't we look for one?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Miss Smith, that was one of the first things that occurred to me. I made a thorough check and I can assure you that there are no unaccounted for nuclear generators in the central London area.
DOCTOR: No, he's right you know, Sarah. It is pretty unlikely, isn't it?

(SARAH looks pale and tired.)

DOCTOR: Look, why don't you try and get some rest, uh?
SARAH: Alright.

(She goes to the door and waits as the DOCTOR goes into the TARDIS.)

DOCTOR: Right, I'll be getting on with it.

(The BRIGADIER checks his watch.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: I've got yet another planning conference with General Finch. Look after Miss Smith, Benton.
SERGEANT BENTON: Right, sir.

(He opens the door for the BRIGADIER...)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Thank you.

(...who leaves.)

SERGEANT BENTON: (To SARAH.) Well, would you like a cup of tea or anything?
SARAH: Typical! Run away and play while the grown-ups get on with the real work!
SERGEANT BENTON: What do you mean?
SARAH: The power's coming from somewhere, right? So there must be an independent source?

(Her head still sore, she sits at the bench.)

SERGEANT BENTON: I suppose so, but where would you start...
SARAH: So if it is a nuclear reactor it would have been designed and assembled and all that could be traced - there'd be records.
SERGEANT BENTON: The Brigadier's checked all that, Miss.

(SARAH hangs her head in a mixture of pain and annoyance.)

SARAH: Oh...
SERGEANT BENTON: If there was anything there then he would have found it.
SARAH: Well maybe it was all secret.
SERGEANT BENTON: Too secret for the Brigadier to know about?

(This makes sense to SARAH.)

SARAH: Yes, why not? Can you get me some transport?
SERGEANT BENTON: Oh no, I couldn't do that...
SARAH: (Pouts.) Oh, they told you to look after me. Come on!
SERGEANT BENTON: Well, where do you want to go and what shall I tell the Doctor?
SARAH: Well, tell him...

(She smiles.)

SARAH: Tell him I've gone out to play, hmm? Come on!

(She heads for the door. BENTON closes his eyes, mouths "On no!" and follows.)


26: INT. CHARLES GROVER'S OFFICE

(CHARLES GROVER opens the door of his small but ornate and pleasant Whitehall office. SARAH is there.)

CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Come in! What a pleasant surprise.

(They shake hands.)

SARAH: Erm, I don't suppose you remember, Minister, but we met briefly at UNIT?
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: You're far too modest, Miss Smith. Of course I remember.

(He closes the door and shows her in.)

CHARLES GROVER M.P.: I'm sorry you had to find your own way here but I'm down to a skeleton staff.

(He pulls forward a chair for her.)

SARAH: Oh, thank you.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: However, I can offer you a cup of tea.

(On a sideboard in the alcove next to the fireplace is a kettle and several cups.)

CHARLES GROVER M.P.: We have our own little generator down in the basement - petrol driven. Can I get you a cup?
SARAH: Er, no, not at the moment, thank you.

(GROVER sits behind his desk.)

SARAH: I'm sorry to bother you like this, but you seem to be the only member of the government still in London.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Oh, I am. The rest all shot off to Harrogate, but I told the Prime Minister if I'm in charge, I'm going to stay here - on the spot.

(He smiles.)

CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Now, what can I do for you?
SARAH: Well, you know the Doctor's theory about these materialisations - they must need a tremendous energy force.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Yes?
SARAH: Well the Doctor said it would have to be something like a nuclear generator...and that started me remembering something. Wasn't there a plan once to build underground quarters for the government in the event of an atomic war?
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Yes, back in the cold war days. Oh, I see what you're getting at. Oh, I don't think any of them were ever built, you know?
SARAH: Are you sure of that? Each of those places was to have its own nuclear generator.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: (Thinks.) That's right. I was a junior backbencher at the time but I remember...plans were made...and then shelved when the situation eased.

(SARAH stands, caught up in the excitement of her latest idea.)

SARAH: But suppose one was built, right here in London?
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: That's a very ingenious theory, young lady. What does the Brigadier think about it, or the Doctor?
SARAH: I'm not telling anyone about it - until I can get some evidence.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: I wonder...if it could have happened as you say?
SARAH: Oh, I thought if I came to you, you could help me check up on it.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: And so I can.

(He nods to a door at the back of his office.)

CHARLES GROVER M.P.: In there are confidential ministerial files going back years. Let's take a look.

(SARAH suppresses her excitement as GROVER shows her to the filing room door. He opens it and ushers her in.)

SARAH: Thank you.


27: INT. FILING ROOM

(The small room is filled with filing cabinets. SARAH immediately starts to look over them - therefore failing to see an inner door which slides shut across the panelled office door.)

CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Fantastic filing system they have in here. I hardly understand it myself but then of course I've only been a minister for six months.

(SARAH smiles politely but is busy looking at an index.)

SARAH: Could it be this - "Top secret construction projects"?
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: I wonder? Number two, three, nine, five. Now that should be over here somewhere.

(He opens a drawer and pulls out a file.)

CHARLES GROVER M.P.: No, there's nothing here. This is all about building RAF early warning stations in Scotland.
SARAH: Well, perhaps one of the other files in the same category?
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Oh, we can but look.

(He pulls out another file and looks over it in astonishment.)

CHARLES GROVER M.P.: Good lord! You're right - look!

(He places the file on top of a cabinet and the two start to look through its contents.)

SARAH: They built it twenty years ago, right in the centre of London.
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: And there's a map here, showing its exact position.
SARAH: Well, there's Whitehall, so this must...

(She traces the position on the map.)

SARAH: It's here...it's right here! It must be under this building!

(GROVER goes and presses a button to open the sliding door. Smiling, SARAH turns to leave...)


28: INT. BUNKER. PASSAGE OUTSIDE FILING ROOM LIFT

(...but her smile disappears when she sees that through the door is not the office but instead a passageway of concrete buttresses, brick walls painted red and wall and ceiling lights.)

CHARLES GROVER M.P.: After you, Miss Smith.

(He pushes her out of the lift room and into the passageway.)


29: INT. SCHOOL SCIENCE LABORATORY

(The DOCTOR comes out of the TARDIS. He goes to one of the doors and calls down the corridor.)

DOCTOR: Sergeant? Sergeant Benton?

(BENTON comes in to answer the summons.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Yes, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Look, I'll need some more electronic equipment. Can you organise it?
SERGEANT BENTON: Yes, of course.
DOCTOR: Ah, thanks very much.

(He goes to the bench to start writing his list of requirements.)

DOCTOR: How's Miss Smith?
SERGEANT BENTON: Oh, fine, as far as I know.
DOCTOR: Er, did you give her somewhere to rest?
SERGEANT BENTON: Well, she didn't want to rest. I...I got her some transport and she shot off somewhere.
DOCTOR: Oh, where?
SERGEANT BENTON: She wouldn't say. She said to tell you she'd gone out to play!

(The DOCTOR looks sharply at him and sighs.)

DOCTOR: You know sometimes that girl baffles me!


30: INT. BUNKER. ROOM

(SARAH has been taken to a small square room. Painted red within, it has a small blue light on each of its four walls and a black chair in the middle. Apart from that, it is bare. BUTLER has joined her and GROVER.)

SARAH: You're mad - you're absolutely raving mad!
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: On the contrary, Miss Smith. My associates and I are on the only ones who are sane.
SARAH: Creating monsters in central London?
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: There's a very good reason for it - which you'll one day learn. Now I'm afraid I must leave you.

(He and BUTLER head for the door.)

SARAH: They'll find me, you know?
CHARLES GROVER M.P.: I very much doubt it, Miss Smith - not where you're going.

(They leave. SARAH tries the door but then sits in the chair to think. After a second, the ceiling lights in the room dim and the blue wall lights start to flash in a hypnotic sequence. Starting to feel overcome, SARAH swings the chair round to face first one wall, then another but she cannot escape the effect of the lights. Her head starts to sway and her eyes become unfocussed...)


31: INT. CHAMBER

(SARAH comes round to see a dark-haired good-looking young man staring down at her. He wears a white T-shirt and a blue denim jacket and jeans. He smiles at her.)

MARK: Welcome, sister.
SARAH: Who are you?

(She looks round in confusion. She is on a black leather trolley in a brightly lit control chamber which is predominantly pale blue and white. Screens partition the room and there are comfortable blue leather seats. The whole room has a futuristic but sterile look to it.)

SARAH: Where am I?
MARK: My name is Mark. I welcome you to the people.

(SARAH sits up. Her clothes have been changed and she too wears a blue denim suit.)

SARAH: What people?
MARK: You'll soon remember.
SARAH: And where is this?
MARK: (Puzzled.) The spaceship? You see, it's all come true.

(SARAH'S voice starts to contain an element of panic.)

SARAH: Now what's going on? Where am I?
MARK: We're on our way.

(MARK walks over to a small hatch in the wall beneath which are a set of controls. He presses one to open the hatch.)

MARK: Soon we shall arrive on the planet that's to be our new home.
SARAH: Planet? Spaceship? What are you talking about?

(Somewhat groggily, SARAH moves over to the hatch and looks out in astonishment.)


32: SPACE

(It is a window looking out on to the blackness of space with a small planet in the distance.)

MARK: (OOV.) We left Earth three months ago.


Next Episode


Doctor Who
JON PERTWEE

Sarah Jane Smith
ELISABETH SLADEN

Brigadier
Lethbridge Stewart
NICHOLAS COURTNEY

General Finch
JOHN BENNETT

Charles Grover M.P.
NOEL JOHNSON

Professor Whitaker
PETER MILES

Butler
MARTIN JARVIS

Captain Yates
RICHARD FRANKLIN

Sergeant Benton
JOHN LEVENE

Mark
TERENCE WILTON

Written by
MALCOLM HULKE

Title Music
RON GRAINER
and BBC RADIOPHONIC
WORKSHOP

Title Sequence
BERNARD LODGE

Incidental Music
DUDLEY SIMPSON

Special Sound
DICK MILLS

Script Editor
TERRANCE DICKS

Designer
RICHARD MORRIS

Producer
BARRY LETTS

Directed by
PADDY RUSSELL

COLOUR

BBC 1973

 

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