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THE
TIME MONSTER

BY
ROBERT SLOMAN

EPISODE TWO


1: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

DR. RUTH INGRAM: Surely you don't need to wear anti-radiation gear, professor?
MASTER: In case of an emergency, my dear. I may have to join Mr. Hyde in a hurry. (Into intercom.) Report, Mr. Hyde?
STUART HYDE: (Over intercom.) Interstitial activity- nil.

(RUTH gives off the readings from her unit...)

DR. RUTH INGRAM: Molecular structure - stable. Four-o, four-five, five-o.
MASTER: Increase in power.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Isolate matrix scanner.
STUART HYDE: (Over intercom.) Check.

(A strident note appears within the hum of the equipment...)

DR. RUTH INGRAM: Six-o, six-five, seven-o, seven-five...
MASTER: Increase in power!
DR. RUTH INGRAM: It's gone into the second quadrant already, professor.
MASTER: I know what I'm doing, doctor. Initiating transfer - now.

(He slams home the lever watched by a worried RUTH.)

STUART HYDE: (Over intercom.) Ten, nine, eight...


2: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. SECOND ROOM

(The crystal starts to glow with an intense light.)

STUART HYDE: (Into intercom.) Seven, six, five...


3: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

STUART HYDE: (Over intercom.) Four, three, two, one...

(The cup and saucer disappear in front of the eyes of the astonished observers. Once again, the hum of the equipment starts to run away. RUTH looks towards STUART in the second room in alarm.)

STUART HYDE: (Shouts, into intercom.) I'm getting too much power! I can't hold it! Switch off!
DR. RUTH INGRAM: (Shouts.) Turn it off, professor! Turn it off!

(The MASTER looks upwards and slams up higher the power lever...)

MASTER: Come, Kronos, come!
DR. RUTH INGRAM: (Shocked.) Stuart!

(She runs over to the window looking onto the second room and sees...)


4: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. SECOND ROOM

(...STUART grabbing his head in pain and falling backwards as he tries to rip off his hood.)


5: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(The BRIGADIER rushes to join her at the door and open it.)

DR. RUTH INGRAM: No, wait! It's too dangerous! Professor!

(But the MASTER has run off. As the equipment hum rises ever higher, she desperately pulls the power lever back.)


6: EXT. NEWTON INSTITUTE

(The stable clock shows dead on two o'clock. Once again its chimes are slowed down at a dull clang as Bessie, in an ironic counter to the timepiece, races up to the building at a hurtling speed and stops on an instant.)

DOCTOR: Right, Jo.

(JO doesn't react.)

DOCTOR: Jo?

(He looks at her. She is frozen in time in her seat and stares ahead without reacting.)

DOCTOR: Oh, good grief!

(Unaffected by the slow down of time like the MASTER, he jumps out of the car and starts to run towards the stable block, but in slow motion. As he turns a corner and enters through a doorway, he fails to spot the MASTER, still in his radiation suit, pressed up against a nearby wall in hiding.)


7: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(The DOCTOR bursts into the laboratory and instantly assesses the situation.)

DOCTOR: Cut the power!
DR. RUTH INGRAM: (Desperately.) I can't, it won't budge!
DOCTOR: Then reverse the polarity!
DR. RUTH INGRAM: What?
DOCTOR: Reverse the temporal polarity!

(RUTH pulls a unit out of the main console, swaps round a circuit and plugs the unit back in. She then pulls the power levers back as the others watch impatiently from the doorway to the second room.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Is it safe to go in?
DR. RUTH INGRAM: No, no wait.

(DR. COOK tries to assert his authority...)

DR. COOK: (Angrily.) What is all this about?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Impatiently.) Oh, for heaven's sake! There's a man in there!

(The scream of the equipment is fast dying down.)

DR. RUTH INGRAM: Right, the level should be alright now.

(The BRIGADIER runs into the second room.)


8: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. SECOND ROOM

(STUART lies unconscious across the equipment.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Doctor?

(The DOCTOR is right behind the BRIGADIER and they lift the man up. An astonishing change has occurred. The previously young man now has snowy white hair and a lined face. Appearance wise, he has aged into his eighties. RUTH has also come into the room and stares in shock at her colleague.)

DR. RUTH INGRAM: Stuart!
DR. COOK: (Angrily.) If this meant to be some kind of a joke...
DR. PERCIVAL: (Angrily.) What on earth is going on?!
DOCTOR: (To RUTH.) Who is this?
DR. RUTH INGRAM: My assistant - but Stuart's only twenty-five!
DOCTOR: Twenty-five? But this man's eighty or more?

(Freed from the effects of TOMTIT, JO runs into the room.)

JO: What's happening, Doctor? Are we too late?
DOCTOR: On the contrary, Jo, I think we're just in time.


9: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. STUART'S ROOM

(STUART has been taken to his room in the institute. On two levels, it is simultaneously a bedroom, living room and kitchen with the only divisions being shelving units. He has been put into his bed in the lower level and, watched over by the DOCTOR and JO, RUTH takes a thermometer out of his mouth and reads the temperature. The BRIGADIER enters.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: How is he?
DOCTOR: Well, what he needs at the moment is rest. We'll get him to the hospital later. He must have been a pretty tough youngster.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: He was.
DOCTOR: Well, lucky for him. Otherwise the shock of the change would have finished him off.
JO: But will he be alright?
DOCTOR: Yes, he'll survive.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Yes, but how long for, Doctor? He's an old man.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: What caused it, Doctor - some sort of radioactivity?
DOCTOR: No, it was more than that.
JO: A change in metabolism?
DOCTOR: Well, that's more like it, Jo, but it still isn't the answer - even if the metabolic rate had increased a hundredfold.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: That's impossible.
DOCTOR: Well, of course it is. Even if it wasn't, the change in him would have taken...seven or eight months, not eight seconds.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Well, there's only one thing I know which makes people old...
DOCTOR: And that is?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Anno Domini, Doctor - age, the passing of time.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: We all know that.
DOCTOR: Mmm, congratulations, Brigadier. I think you've provided the explanation.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Well, glad to be of service. (Puzzled.) What did I say?
DOCTOR: "The passing of time." - that's the only possible answer. Stuart's own personal time speeded up so enormously that his own physiological life passed by in a moment. But why? How did it happen?

(He crosses to one side of the room, deep in thought.)

DR. RUTH INGRAM: Well, the professor might know but he seems to have disappeared.
JO: What professor?
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Professor Thascales - TOMTIT's his baby.

(The DOCTOR spins round.)

DOCTOR: Thascales! Really, the arrogance of that man is beyond belief!
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Well, who's arrogance? Doctor, I wish you wouldn't talk in riddles.
DOCTOR: Perhaps a classical education would have helped you, Brigadier. Thascales is a Greek word.
JO: (To herself.) Thascales? (To the DOCTOR.) I get it - Thascales is Greek for "Master"!
DOCTOR: Right, Jo.

(STUART starts to stir and moan.)

STUART HYDE: Mmm, no...
DR. RUTH INGRAM: He's coming round.

(Although weakened, he starts to feebly thrash about in the bed.)

STUART HYDE: ...oh no, help me, help...
DR. RUTH INGRAM: It's alright, it's alright, you're quite safe!
STUART HYDE: ...not safe, no, nobody's safe...
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Shh! It's alright.
STUART HYDE: .. no one's safe - oh, he's here...he...
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Shh!
STUART HYDE: ...he's here, I saw him, I saw him.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Oh, the poor boy's delirious.
STUART HYDE: No, no, no...
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Don't try to speak, Stu, just rest.
DOCTOR: No, no, let him talk. Who did you see, Stuart? Answer me.
STUART HYDE: ...danger, the...the crystal...
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Please stop this, Doctor, please?
DOCTOR: Look, answer me! Stuart, who did you see?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Go easy, Doctor.
STUART HYDE: No...no...
JO: Doctor, please?
DOCTOR: Be quiet - both of you! (Shouts.) Now answer me - who did you see? Answer me!
STUART HYDE: The...K...

(He sits up in bed and opens his eyes as he struggles to get the word out, then...)

STUART HYDE: (Shouts.) Kronos!

(He falls back.)

DOCTOR: Kronos? Yes, of course! I should have known. Dr. Ingram, I want you to come with me. I want you to tell me everything that you know about that machine of yours.
JO: Shall I come?
DOCTOR: No, no, you stay here with Stuart. Phone me immediately he starts talking again.

(He heads for the door followed by RUTH and the BRIGADIER.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: You'd better lock the door behind us, Miss Grant.
DOCTOR: Brigadier, don't hang about. I have a job for you too, you know?

(They leave as JO starts to minister to STUART.)


10: INT. UNIT HQ. BRIGADIER'S OFFICE

(CAPTAIN YATES is using the BRIGADIER'S desk in his commanding officer's absence. Taking a radio call over an intercom unit on the desk, he scribbles down his instructions.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (Into radio.) Newton...Institute...Wootton. Got that, sir. Over.

(He presses the button. The reply is filled with static.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (Into radio.) Say again, sir, I didn't quite get that, over.


11: EXT. NEWTON INSTITUTE

(The BRIGADIER repeats his instructions into his TM45 radio.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Into radio.) I said bring some men with you. I feel as naked as a babe in his bath. I'll want light and heavy machine guns. Oh, and Yates? Shove a couple of anti-tank guns in the boot, will you? Over.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (OOV: Over radio.) You got tanks there, sir? Over.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Into radio.) You never know, Captain, you never know. Over.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (OOV: Over radio.) Right, sir, and, er, when, sir? I mean - how soon? Over.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Into radio.) Oh, the usual, Captain Yates, about ten minutes ago. Oh, Yates, the Doctor wants you to bring his TARDIS with you. Alright? Over.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (OOV: Over radio.) Right, sir. Out.

(At that moment, DR'S PERCIVAL and COOK with PROCTOR in tow, come out of the main door of the house and towards their car and the UNIT jeep.)

DR. COOK: I'm sorry, Charles, but the whole thing smells of bad fish, ___.
DR. PERCIVAL: But I'd take my reputation on the professor's integrity.
DR. COOK: You already have, Charles, you already have. A foolish gamble, gone wrong. Now, it's not surprising that you lost.
DR. PERCIVAL: Please, Humphrey!
DR. COOK: I can see no alternative to a full Whitehall inquiry. I can only hope that we don't have to...parade our dirty linen at Westminster, not to mention Brussels.

(The BRIGADIER closes the door of the jeep and approaches them.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Forgive me, Mr. Cook?
DR. COOK: (Coldly.) Dr. Cook.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: I'm so sorry, Dr. Cook. I couldn't help overhearing what you said.
DR. COOK: Well?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: This affair's no longer in your hands, sir.
DR. COOK: I beg your pardon?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: This is now a security matter. I've taken over.
DR. COOK: You have no right...
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Interrupts.) I'm sorry, sir. I've every right - Subsection 3A of the preamble to the Seventh Enabling Act. Paragraph 24G, if I remember rightly.
DR. COOK: (Floored.) Oh...
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: So, bearing in mind the Official Secrets Act as well, you'll please make certain that you say not a word about today's events to anybody - either of you.
PROCTOR: That's all very well...
DR. COOK: (Interrupts.) Be quiet, Proctor. (To the BRIGADIER.) You can't possible have sufficient grounds for such high-handed behaviour.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: This man, Thascales, he's a dangerous criminal and an escaped prisoner. Sufficient grounds?
DR. COOK: Oh, well, er, yes. Come along, Proctor, don't stand about! You'll be hearing from us, Charles.

(PROCTOR opens the back door the limousine for his boss who gets in as the driver starts the engine up. PROCTOR climbs in after his boss and the vehicle speeds away. DR. PERCIVAL makes his way back to the house.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Oh, excuse me, sir?

(PERCIVAL seems to ignore him.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Shouts.) Dr. Percival?

(PERCIVAL turns, rubbing his drawn face.)

DR. PERCIVAL: Er...what?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: You feeling quite well, sir?
DR. PERCIVAL: Yes, yes, of course I am. Oh, this whole matter is... a shock, but...what did you want?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: I'd like this whole place evacuated of all but essential personnel at once, please.
DR. PERCIVAL: I can't think, Brigadier, you have the slightest idea of what you're asking. There are projects in train...
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Interrupts.) I'm sorry, sir, but it's absolutely necessary. Now, Sergeant Benton will keep an eye on this machine of yours until the troops arrive. But I can't be held responsible for the consequences unless you do as I ask.
DR. PERCIVAL: (Angrily.) Brigadier, you may enjoy playing at soldiers...
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Interrupts.) By three o'clock, please, Dr. Percival.

(PERCIVAL sees that the BRIGADIER means what he sees and again turns back for the house.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: And if the Master contacts you, don't try to hold onto him. Just let me know at once.
DR. PERCIVAL: Who?

(The BRIGADIER smiles at his own error.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: I'm sorry. Of course, I mean the professor.
DR. PERCIVAL: Well, he'll be miles away by now.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: I doubt it. There's no reason why he should know we're onto him. He'll be back.

(He strides off leaving a very worried looking DR. PERCIVAL behind.)


12: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(There is a knock on the door of the TOMTIT laboratory. SERGEANT BENTON, on guard, unlocks the door and opens it. RUTH and the DOCTOR walk in.)

DOCTOR: Any trouble?
SERGEANT BENTON: Well, I've been a bit lonely, but that's all.
DOCTOR: Good, good.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: But, Doctor, why won't you explain?
DOCTOR: Because I must find out whether I'm right - that's why. Now where's the crystal?
DR. RUTH INGRAM: It's through here.

(She leads him towards the second room. BENTON follows.)


13: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. SECOND ROOM

(She opens the door and points to the crystal under the perspex cover.)

DR. RUTH INGRAM: There.

(The DOCTOR walks over to the unit, pulls off the cover and leans over the trident-shaped crystal.)

DOCTOR: The crystal of Kronos! So I am right!
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Kronos? Well, that's what Stuart said. Look, Doctor, what is all this about?
DOCTOR: Well...it'll be difficult to accept - I warn you.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Well, try me.
DOCTOR: Well, luckily you are already familiar with the idea of stepping outside of space-time.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: I've lived with the concept for months.
DOCTOR: And I've lived with it for many long years. I've been there.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: You have?
DOCTOR: Yes, I have. Strange place it is too. Place that is no place...a dangerous place where...creatures love beyond your wildest imagination - Chronovores, time eaters. They swallow a life as quickly as a boa constrictor can swallow a rabbit, fur and all.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: (Amazed.) Are you saying that...Kronos is one of these creatures?
DOCTOR: I am. The most fearsome of the lot!


14: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

(The MASTER sits in a leather-backed chair in the director's office. He drinks a brandy and smokes a cigar as he works on a paper. The door opens and PERCIVAL walks in. He immediately grows agitated.)

DR. PERCIVAL: You! What're you doing here?

(He starts to look if they have been spotted by anyone in the corridor outside.)

MASTER: Now don't panic. Shut the door and come here.

(PERCIVAL does so.)

DR. PERCIVAL: But they'll find you.
MASTER: Not if you keep your head. Why should they look for me here anyway?

(PERCIVAL is a figure of indecision and nerves.)

MASTER: Look, don't fidget, please!


15: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. SECOND ROOM

DR. RUTH INGRAM: But Kronos was a Greek legend. He was the Titan who ate his children, wasn't he?
DOCTOR: Yes, exactly. And what's more, one of those children in the legend was Poseidon, the god of Atlantis.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Are you trying to tell us that the classical gods are real?
DOCTOR: Well, yes and no. Extraordinary people, the Atlantians, you know. Even more extraordinary than their cousins in Athens. Huh! Once reality became unbearable for them, they would invent a legend to tame it.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: You mean, like the legend of Kronos?
DOCTOR: Quite so. Kronos, a living creature, was drawn at a time by the priests of Atlantis, using that crystal as its centre.

(He points at the crystal.)

DR. RUTH INGRAM: You mean, that...that crystal is the original? The actual crystal from Atlantis?
DOCTOR: It is, and your friend, the professor, is trying to use that crystal, as it was used four thousand years ago, to capture the Chronavore.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: So that's what you meant when you talked of terrible danger.
SERGEANT BENTON: Danger to us, you mean, Doctor, or to the whole world?
DOCTOR: Not just danger to our world, Sergeant - or even our galaxy...but to the entire created universe!


16: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

(DR. PERCIVAL has not calmed down, in contrast to the MASTER who coolly blows out a cloud of cigar smoke.)

DR. PERCIVAL: But suppose somebody should walk in here now and find me talking to you.
MASTER: Oh dear, you are a worrier, aren't you?! Come here...closer.

(DR. PERCIVAL steps closer to the chair and the MASTER looks up at him with his hypnotic stare.)

MASTER: Now look into my eyes. There is nothing to worry about. Everything will be alright if you just obey me. Just obey me...
DR. PERCIVAL: (Haltingly.) Obey...I must obey...everything will be alright.
MASTER: That's better.

(He points at PERCIVAL'S desk.)

MASTER: Now you go along there and carry along with your telephoning, and let me get on with my sums.

(The thoroughly subdued director crosses to his desk and sits, picking up one of the telephones.)

MASTER: You know, it's a long time since I came across a hypnotic subject who turned out to be as good as you are. Hmm! It's just like old times!

(He laughs quietly.)


17: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(The DOCTOR, RUTH and BENTON have returned to the first room where the DOCTOR holds a small hand-sensor over the equipment, looking at the readings.)

DOCTOR: There are two things I don't quite understand, though? One is the massive power build up that you had, and the second is the strength of the signal that I received on the time sensor.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Yes, but you said yourself it picks up all time field disturbances.
DOCTOR: Oh, indeed it does. The strength of the signal was far too strong for an apparatus as crude as this. However...

(He stops examining the readings of the equipment in the middle of the room and turns his attention to tall computer unit that stands against the right-hand wall. His sensor gives him a reading.)

DOCTOR: Ah...
SERGEANT BENTON: Well, what is it, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yes, well I thought it would be around here somewhere. This, Sergeant, is the Master's TARDIS.


18: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

(The MASTER scribbles notes as PERCIVAL makes a phone call.)

MASTER: (Mutters.) E to the power of seven, E equals MC cubed.
DR. PERCIVAL: Squared. (Into phone.) Er, yes, thank you at once.

(He puts the phone down.)

MASTER: What?
DR. PERCIVAL: E equals MC squared, not cubed.
MASTER: (Snaps.) Not in the extra-temporal physics of the time vortex. Oh dear, now you've made me lose my place. You're an interfering dolt, Percival!
DR. PERCIVAL: I am sorry. What are you doing?
MASTER: Ah, dear, I am trying to find out why we had that massive power build-up. It makes the whole experiment uncontrollable, even the filter didn't prevent it...and logically, it just shouldn't happen.


19: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(The same conversation is taking place in the laboratory.)

DOCTOR: Logically, it just shouldn't happen.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: But it did.
DOCTOR: Yes, indeed it did. So, there's only one thing left for us to do. Wouldn't you agree, Sergeant?
SERGEANT BENTON: Oh, yes, sure - what, for instance?
DOCTOR: Switch on, and take a look for ourselves.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Right.

(She switches the main unit on as BENTON looks through the closed door into the second room.)

DOCTOR: It's reading ten already.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: But that's impossible!
SERGEANT BENTON: Doctor? Doctor, the crystal's glowing.

(The DOCTOR joins him.)


20: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. SECOND ROOM

(He opens the door and looks over at the glowing crystal.)

DOCTOR: Sergeant, now you're a strong young man, go in there and pick up that crystal, will you?
SERGEANT BENTON: (Shocked.) Doctor! Stuart w...
DOCTOR: (Interrupts.) It's perfectly safe at this low level, believe me.
SERGEANT BENTON: If you say so, Doctor.
DOCTOR: I do.

(BENTON gingerly walks in. He holds the crystal in his cupped hands and attempts to lift it.)

SERGEANT BENTON: It's fixed down.
DOCTOR: No, it isn't you know. You can see it isn't.

(BENTON tries again.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Well, I can't shift it.

(The DOCTOR and RUTH come into the room.)

DOCTOR: (Thinks.) No...no, of course you can't. Do you know why you can't shift it? Because that crystal isn't really here at all. It's made the jump through interstitial time. Must to be linked to that other crystal all those thousands of years ago. Or rather it is the other crystal.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: But then where is the original one?
DOCTOR: Where do you think? In Atlantis, of course.


21: INT. ATLANTIS. THE TEMPLE OF POSEIDON

(Thousands of years earlier, just as in the DOCTOR'S dream, a bolt of forked lightning crackles down into the darkened temple of Poseidon, to the shock of a watching child of the temple - a NEOPHITE. Also from the DOCTOR'S dream, a crystal sits in a font-type receptacle and starts to glow. The bare-chested boy runs down from the altar to a nearby figure. He sits at his feet in terror.)

NEOPHITE: Holiness! Holiness! Come quickly! The crystal is afire!

(The figure is the high priest of the temple - KRASIS. An elderly man, whose long braided brown hair has not lost its colour, he wears a red cloak over his white robes and a gold head-band. In amazement, he approaches the altar as there is another crack of thunder. Delight appears on the old man's face and he starts to whisper reverently.)

KRASIS: At last! At last, Kronos, the time is come! And wait your call!

(He looks up to the heavens, not realising that he is being watched by a young man stood behind a nearby pillar. He too is bare-chested and wears a white kilt-like robe and wears his dark hair long. The young man - HIPPIAS - watches intently.)


22: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(Centuries later, the telephone rings in the laboratory.)

SERGEANT BENTON: (In second room.) 'Scuse me, Doctor.

(BENTON leaves the DOCTOR and RUTH and returns to the first room, picking up the phone.)

SERGEANT BENTON: (Into phone.) Sergeant Benton? (He listens.) Ah, hello, Miss Grant. (Listens.) Yeah, yeah, he's here. (Listens.) Oh, I see. Look, hang on a sec...

(He calls through to the second room.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Doctor?
DOCTOR: (In second room.) Mmm?

(He joins the SERGEANT.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Doctor, it's Jo. She says Stuart Hyde's coming to. He's in a bit of a state, it seems.
DOCTOR: Alright. Tell her I'm on my way. You'd better stay here, Sergeant.
SERGEANT BENTON: Right.
DOCTOR: You coming, Ruth, er Dr. Ingam?
DR. RUTH INGRAM: Ruth will do.

(They start off.)

SERGEANT BENTON: (Into phone.) Hello, Jo?


23: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. STUART'S ROOM

JO: (Into phone, smiles.) It's alright, I heard. (She listens.) Well, no, no, not scared exactly. Just a bit, well you know - churned up. (Listens.) Yeah, and a merry Michaelmas to you too!

(STUART has started to stir on the bed.)

STUART HYDE: Kronos..
JO: (Into phone.) Oh, lor', I'm forgetting my patient. See you, Sergeant.
STUART HYDE: Krono...

(JO puts the phone down and runs over to STUART as the "young" man tries to sit up.)

JO: You alright?
STUART HYDE: I felt him coming back...
JO: Who?
STUART HYDE: Kronos. Oh, don't let him touch me...

(She tries to push him back down.)

JO: It's alright, you're alright.
STUART HYDE: Oh, I'm burning...burning...
JO: You're quite safe, honestly. Shh, shh... (Whispers.) You're safe.

(STUART opens his eyes and looks at her.)

STUART HYDE: Who are you?
JO: I'm Jo.
STUART HYDE: Oh, where am I?
JO: You're in your own room.
STUART HYDE: Oh, I've got the grand-daddy of all hangovers. Oh, oh...

(He raises a hand to rub his eyes and suddenly sees how lined they are.)

STUART HYDE: My hands! What...?

(He starts to become agitated as JO tries desperately to calm him down.)

JO: Well...it's alright...
STUART HYDE: What's happened to my hands?
JO: It's alright, honestly.
STUART HYDE: My mirror?
JO: It's a difficult thing to...
STUART HYDE: Where's my mirror?
JO: There isn't.
STUART HYDE: Give me a mirror.
JO: Please? I'll get you one later. Come on, now just lie down and...

(But STUART leans over to the other side of the bed and grabs a small mirror. He looks at the reflection in shock.)

STUART HYDE: Oh, no! No! No!

(His head falls.)


24: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

(PERCIVAL sits patiently at his desk as the MASTER finishes scribbling his final calculations.)

MASTER: That's o, o, three, five, seven. Point o, o, three, five, seven. Good!
DR. PERCIVAL: You've finished?
MASTER: Yes, at last.

(He stands up.)

MASTER: Now, back to the laboratory.
DR. PERCIVAL: Yes, well they'll have somebody on guard.
MASTER: Ah, yes. You don't happen to know who it is, do you?
DR. PERCIVAL: Yes, er, a Sergeant Benton, I think.
MASTER: Really? Well, I think I know how to deal with him.


25: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. STUART'S ROOM

(The DOCTOR and RUTH have returned to STUART'S room. He has calmed down and is sat up in bed as he relates his story.)

STUART HYDE: It was just after the cup and saucer appeared. I was about to switch off...when it...happened.

(He starts to become emotional again at what has happened to him.)

DOCTOR: Go on, old chap. Go on, you're doing fine.
STUART HYDE: Like...like a tub of flame. All my body was on fire. All my life, all my energy, was...being sucked out of me.
DOCTOR: Why did you say Kronos?
STUART HYDE: Because that's who it was.
DOCTOR: How did you know?
STUART HYDE: I just knew.
DR. RUTH INGRAM: You mean you heard a voice or something?
STUART HYDE: No, I...just knew.
DOCTOR: It's a race memory. We all have them.
JO: But what is Kronos? Or should I say who?
DOCTOR: Later, Jo, later. Go on, Stuart, what else?
STUART HYDE: Nothing else until I woke up here. Doc, am I really an old man? Is there nothing you can do, or am I stuck...like this?

(The DOCTOR looks apologetic.)

DOCTOR: I'm sorry, Stuart. I just don't know. But I promise you that we'll do everything we possibly can to help you.


26: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(The phone rings again. BENTON, alone in the room, answers it.)

SERGEANT BENTON: (Into phone.) Hello?
DR. PERCIVAL: (OOV: Over phone.) Hello, is that Sergeant Benton?
SERGEANT BENTON: (Into phone.) Yes.
DR. PERCIVAL: (OOV: Over phone.) This is the director. The Brigadier wishes to see you back at the house.
SERGEANT BENTON: (Into phone.) But I don't get it. The Brigadier wants me back at the house?
DR. PERCIVAL: (OOV: Over phone.) Yes, that's right. At once.
SERGEANT BENTON: (Into phone.) Yes, but that means leaving the lab unwatched.


27: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

(The MASTER watches as PERCIVAL makes the call.)

DR. PERCIVAL: (Into phone.) Oh, but he said to be sure to lock up. Those were his very words.


28: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

SERGEANT BENTON: (Into phone, sighs.) I don't know, Dr. Percival. I mean, you've put me in a bit of a spot. The Brigadier told me to stay here no matter what happened. He'll have my stripes if I don't.


29: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

DR. PERCIVAL: (Into phone.) Er, one minute.

(He cups the mouthpiece.)

MASTER: What's the matter?
DR. PERCIVAL: I don't think he believes me.
MASTER: I'm not surprised. I've never seen a more inept performance! Look, tell him to ring the Brigadier for confirmation...
DR. PERCIVAL: But you can't...
MASTER: (Interrupts sternly.) Do as I tell you!
DR. PERCIVAL: (Into phone.) Oh, Sergeant Benton? I suggest you check with Brigadier Stewart yourself.
SERGEANT BENTON: (OOV: Over phone.) Where do I do that?
DR. PERCIVAL: (Into phone.) Er, oh, you want his number? Er...

(The MASTER picks up the second phone and points to the number for PERCIVAL.)

DR. PERCIVAL: (Into phone.) Oh yes, I...I think you can contact him on five-three-four.
SERGEANT BENTON: (OOV: Over phone.) Five-three-four, right.
DR. PERCIVAL: (Into phone.) Yeah...yes, that's right.


30: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

DR. PERCIVAL: (OOV: Over phone.) Goodbye.
SERGEANT BENTON: (Into phone.) Goodbye.

(BENTON starts to dial the number.)


31: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

(The MASTER picks up the receiver of the second phone and speaks in an exact imitation of the BRIGADIER'S voice...)

MASTER: (Into phone.) Lethbridge Stewart?
SERGEANT BENTON: (OOV: Over phone.) Hello, Sergeant Benton here, sir.
MASTER: (Into phone.) Ah, Benton.
SERGEANT BENTON: (OOV: Over phone.) Sir, I've just had the most peculiar phone call.
MASTER: (Into phone.) Nothing peculiar about it, my dear fellow. Perfectly simple. I need you over here, on the double.
SERGEANT BENTON: (OOV: Over phone.) Right, sir.

(The MASTER puts the phone down.)


32: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(BENTON looks intensely troubled as he puts his phone down. He reaches a decision and pulls the sash window open at the back of the room. He looks through to check the nearby roof arrangement and leaves the room.)


33: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

(DR. PERCIVAL looks through his office window to the area near the stable block as the MASTER checks his notes.)

MASTER: Well?
DR. PERCIVAL: No sign of him. Do you think he...he really will...? Ah, there he is.


34: EXT. NEWTON INSTITUTE

(Down below, BENTON comes out of the archway of the laboratory section and walks round the side of the stable block.)


35: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

DR. PERCIVAL: It worked! It really worked!
MASTER: Of course it worked. Now see if the corridor's clear.

(PERCIVAL opens the door and checks outside.)

DR. PERCIVAL: Not a soul, professor.

(He opens the door open for the MASTER and the two men leave.)


36: EXT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. BACK OF THE STABLE BLOCK

(BENTON has climbed onto the roof at the back of the stable block. He checks that he is not watched and, grabbing hold of a fixed ladder and then a drainpipe, climbs across to the open window and back inside the laboratory.)


37: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(The room is still empty. He crosses it and checks through the window on the other side of the room that overlooks the forecourt.)


38: EXT. NEWTON INSTITUTE

(The MASTER and PERCIVAL come out of a French window in the main house. Checking that they have not been seen, they move urgently towards the stable block.)


39: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(Drawing his pistol, BENTON looks round for a hiding place and finally decides to duck down behind the pieces of equipment. He hears PERCIVAL'S whining voice as the two men approach the laboratory.)

DR. PERCIVAL: (OOV: In corridor.) ___ times.

(They enter the room.)

MASTER: Time? Soon I shall have the time in the world, literally.
DR. PERCIVAL: In an hour or so, the place will be swarming with soldiers.

(BENTON shuffles along behind the equipment until...)

MASTER: Dr. Percival, you're beginning to irritate me. Now do be quiet. I tell you that nobody and nothing can stop me now.

(He can jump up and be between the MASTER and the door. He does so, pointing the pistol.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Put your hands in the air, both of you.

(The two men freeze.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Now get 'em up.

(They raise their hands.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Now turn around slow...slowly.

(The two men turn. The MASTER looks utterly shocked.)

MASTER: Well, well, well? The resourceful Sergeant Benton!
SERGEANT BENTON: Yes, well, you didn't really think you could fool me with a fake telephone call, did you? It's the oldest trick in the book.
MASTER: I underestimated you, Sergeant. How did you know?
SERGEANT BENTON: Simple. The Brigadier is not in the habit of calling Sergeant's "my dear fellow".
MASTER: Ah, the tribal taboos of army etiquette. I find it difficult to identify with such primitive absurdities.
SERGEANT BENTON: Yes, well, primitive or not, mate - you're still in the soup without a ladle, aren't you?
MASTER: Now, Sergeant, you must let me explain.

(His hands still raised, the MASTER takes a step towards BENTON.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Keep back! Keep...

(The MASTER stands where he is.)

MASTER: Yes, of course...
SERGEANT BENTON: Keep back.
MASTER: Of course, Sergeant. You see, Sergeant Benton, the whole point is that...

(He looks over BENTON'S shoulder with a cry of delight.)

MASTER: Doctor! What a very time...

(BENTON turns to look and the MASTER jumps forward, grabbing the pistol and throwing BENTON back against a locker and the wall. He hits his head and falls.)

MASTER: (Shouts.) You're wrong, Sergeant Benton. That is the oldest trick in the book!

(He dashes over to the main console and starts flicking switches. The power starts to rise.)

DR. PERCIVAL: What are you going to do?
MASTER: I am going to bring somebody here who can help me find the power that I need. Without it, I am helpless!
DR. PERCIVAL: I don't understand!
MASTER: Of course you don't understand! How could you possibly understand? Only one thing stands between me and complete power over the Earth, over the universe itself. Now the one I bring here will show me how to harness that power. Now...

(He slams home the two power levers and points PERCIVAL towards the second room.)

MASTER: You watch that crystal!


40: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. SECOND ROOM

(PERCIVAL looks through the glass partitions at the crystal as it glows again.)


41: INT. ATLANTIS. THE TEMPLE OF POSEIDON

(Still watched by HIPPIAS, KRASIS stands with his arms raised before the crystal in the temple, his voice rising...)

KRASIS: Lord of life, give me of thy power! Oh, mighty Kronos, lord of death! Give me thy power! Oh, mighty Kronos, lord of life, give me thy strength!

(Lighting forks down into the temple.)

KRASIS: (Shouts.) Mighty lord, exalted one - I hear and obey!

(There is another crash of lightning and KRASIS fades away, to HIPPIAS' amazement.)


42: INT. NEWTON INSTITUTE. LABORATORY. FIRST ROOM

(BENTON starts to stir on the floor. He sits up and starts to edge towards the door. He sees the MASTER and PERCIVAL intently looking through the glass into the second room where a dazzling display of white light starts to flare out. A figure starts to materialise within the light. PERCIVAL turns in shock to the MASTER as, with a crash of thunder, KRASIS appears in the twentieth century.)


Next Episode


Dr. Who
JON PERTWEE

Master
ROGER DELGADO

Jo Grant
KATY MANNING

Brigadier Lethbridge Stewart
NICHOLAS COURTNEY

Captain Mike Yates
RICHARD FRANKLIN

Sergeant Benton
JOHN LEVENE

Dr. Ruth Ingram
WANDA MOORE

Stuart Hyde
IAN COLLIER

Dr. Percival
JOHN WYSE

Dr. Cook
NEVILLE BARBER

Proctor
BARRY ASHTON

Krasis
DONALD ECCLES

Hippias
AIDAN MURPHY

Neophite
KEITH DALTON

Written by
ROBERT SLOMAN

Title Music by
RON GRAINER
and BBC Radiophonic Workshop

Music
DUDLEY SIMPSON

Special Sound
BRIAN HODGSON

Visual Effects Designer
MICHAELJOHN HARRIS

Film Cameraman
PETER HAMILTON

Film Sound
DEREK MEDUS

Film Editor
MARTYN DAY

Script Editor
TERRANCE DICKS

Designer
TIM GLEESON

Producer
BARRY LETTS

Directed by
PAUL BERNARD

COLOUR

BBC 1972

 

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