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THE D∆MONS

BY
GUY LEOPOLD

EPISODE ONE


1: EXT. VILLAGE GREEN (NIGHT)

(Flashes of lightning illuminate the small quaint cottages that sit on the edge of the village green of Devilís End. Rain pours down in torrents and a crack of thunder peals over the rooftops. At the end of the green, a typical English village church is bathed in the light of the storm as water streams out of its guttering. Within its environs, the animals of the night shelter from the heavenly outburst. A cat watches as a small furry rodent scurries between the gravestones. Across the green, the pub sign of ďThe Cloven HoofĒ swings in the strong wind and the door opens as open of the regulars leaves the warm inviting interior with his dog. He calls back inside...)

JIM: Goodnight, Frank.
FRANK: (OOV: Inside pub.) Goodnight, Jim.

(The man walks home past the churchyard, his dog pulling all the way but the animal is excitable and as Jim struggles against the storm, his pet pulls free and with a bark runs up a short flight of steps, through the gate and into the churchyard. The man follows as the dog runs into the maze of gravestones. The man looks for him and hears his distant barks. He follows them and hears as the dog suddenly yowls as if in pain. It is then silent. Jim walks through the churchyard to where he last heard his dog but suddenly he sees something and his eyes open with shock. He falls the ground clutching a gravestone...)


2: EXT. VILLAGE STREET

(A middle-aged eccentric looking lady scurries down a road in the village desperately trying to keep with the village doctor - DR. REEVES. The lady - MISS HAWTHORNE - wears a long green cloak and has a talisman around her neck on her chain. She carries a battered umbrella. DR. REEVES is obviously harassed by her presence and walks as fast as he can to his car.)

MISS HAWTHORNE: He died of fright, Doctor.
DR. REEVES My dear Miss Hawthorne...
MISS HAWTHORNE: (Interrupting.) I donít care what you say - the man died of fright!

(DR. REEVES reaches his car and tries to firmly end the conversation.)

DR. REEVES My dear Miss Hawthorne, the medical diagnosis was quite clear- he died of a heart attack.
MISS HAWTHORNE: But his face...!

(DR. REEVES opens the door of his blue saloon.)

DR. REEVES Slight protrusion of the eyeballs, rictus drawing of the lips back over the teeth - common enough in heart failure.

(He gets into his car but MISS HAWTHORNE is not deterred.)

MISS HAWTHORNE: The signs are there for all to see! I cast the runes only this morning.
DR. REEVES Youíll have to excuse me. I have my rounds to do.

(He starts up his car.)

MISS HAWTHORNE: If Professor Horner opens up that barrow, he will bring disaster on us all!

(He drives off, MISS HAWTHORNE shouting after him...)

MISS HAWTHORNE: This is just the beginning!


3: EXT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW

(At the aforementioned barrow, preparations are in hand for a television outside broadcast. A sign points ďTO THE DIGĒ and a BBC technician rolls a wheel of cable towards one of the outside broadcast vans. Lights and cables litter the area. One of the technicians shouts instructions to a colleague as the smartly-suited youthful presenter - ALASTAIR FERGUS - walks towards a canvas tunnel which covers the entrance that has been built into the humped lonely barrow.)

TECHNICIAN: A bit more, David.
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Professor Horner?
TECHNICIAN: Thatís it.
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Oh, whereís he got to, for peteís sake?

(ALASTAIR calls down the tunnel.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: Harry?!

(A young floor manager emerges from the tunnel, clipboard in hand. Calmer than ALASTAIR, he is better dressed for a broadcast from a windswept Wiltshire down.)

HARRY: Hello Alastair, whatís up?
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Whereís Professor Horner?
HARRY: Probably in make-up. Unless heís had second thoughts and scarpered.
ALASTAIR FERGUS: What?!
HARRY: Well, you know the local chat - ďdeath and disaster if he opens the barrowĒ.
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Well, thereíll be a disaster if he doesnít get a shift-on!
HARRY: (Calming.) Okay, okay, Iíll chase him up.

(HARRY goes off leaving a very perturbed and worried ALASTAIR behind.)


4: EXT. UNIT HQ GARAGE

(The DOCTOR, dressed in a blue overall coat, is bent over the engine of Bessie as JO chatters away to him.)

JO: But it really is the dawning of the age of Aquarius!
DOCTOR: So?
JO: Well, that means the occult. Well you know, the supernatural and all that magic bit.

(The DOCTOR sighs and stops work.)

DOCTOR: You know, really Jo, Iím obviously wasting my time trying to turn you into a scientist.

(He hands JO a tool which she puts on the bench.)

JO: Well, how do you know thereís nothing in it?

(The DOCTOR picks up the detachable bonnet of Bessie and puts it back into place.)

DOCTOR: How? Well, I just know, thatís all. Everything that happens in life must have a scientific explanation - if you know where to look for it, that is.

(He tries to get past JO.)

DOCTOR: Excuse me.

(JO steps aside and he goes to the garage bench.)

JO: Yes, but...suppose something was to happen and nobody knew the explanation. Well, nobody in the world - in the universe! Well, that would be magic, wouldnít it?
DOCTOR: (Sighs.) You know Jo, for a reasonably intelligent young lady, you do have the most absurd ideas.

(As he speaks, Bessie starts to drive forward of its own accord. It goes through the open door of the garage. JO is wide-eyed in astonishment.)

JO: Doctor, look!

(They both go to the doorway and watch as the car circles the garage forecourt before it comes back into the garage and stops before them.)

DOCTOR: Bessie, how dare you go gallivanting around like that!

(Bessieís horn beeps once.)

DOCTOR: Are you sorry?

(The horn beeps two more times. JO is speechless.)

DOCTOR: Very well, I forgive you. Now go back to your parking place before I change my mind.

(Bessie starts up again and reverses out of the garage. The DOCTOR and JO hear a voice behind them as MIKE YATES has entered the garage unseen.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: I know thereís a good explanation for all this but I just canít think of it for the moment.
DOCTOR: Would you believe magic?
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Magic?
DOCTOR: Mmm.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (Laughing.) No!
DOCTOR: Well, Jo would.
JO: Thatís not fair!
DOCTOR: Well, you explain it then.
JO: I donít know. (Smiles.) I suppose you did it?
DOCTOR: Naturally - or should I say scientifically. Er, solenoids and a solar mechanism in Bessie and, er...

(He takes his hand out of his pocket. He is holding a small device which has an arial on the side, a small steering wheel at the top and several buttons and dials on it.)

DOCTOR: ...a radio control unit here. See how easy it is to be a magician?
JO: How infuriating can you get?!

(MIKE smiles.)

JO: Hmm, well, it doesnít prove anything.
DOCTOR: Would you like me to show you some more then?
JO: No thanks. Iíve had enough of your knavish tricks! Anyway, I want to see that TV programme.

(JO looks at MIKEíS wristwatch.)

JO: Mike, would you give me a lift?
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Sure.
JO: Thanks.

(She walks out of the backdoor of the garage.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: You coming, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Coming where?
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Well, to see that programme.
DOCTOR: Oh, not you too, Captain Yates?
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Oh, I wouldnít miss it for the world. Itís very exciting.

(The DOCTOR divests himself of his overall coat.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Forecasts of doom and disaster if anyone disturbs the burial chamber.
DOCTOR: (Sighs.) Captain Yates, you astound me.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Well, you never know. Devilís End has a funny reputation.

(The DOCTORíS whole manner changes. His smile disappears and he looks sharply at CAPTAIN YATES.)

DOCTOR: What did you say?
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Devilís End - the village near the dig.

(The DOCTOR goes into a reverie, muttering to himself as he tries to bring a memory to the forefront of his mind.)

DOCTOR: Devilís End? Devilís End?
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Doctor, are you all right?

(The DOCTOR puts his coat on a peg and picks up his normal red jacket.)

DOCTOR: Yes, yes, Iím fine.

(He walks out of the garage towards Bessie.)

DOCTOR: Fine...
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Now where are you going?
DOCTOR: To see that TV programme, of course!

(A puzzled MIKE puts his cap on and heads the other way.)


5: INT. CHURCH. CAVERN

(Microphone in hand, ALASTAIR FERGUS speaks to his audience, his voice echoing in the cavern.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (To camera.) Devilís End - the very name sends a shiver up the spine.

(FERGUSí name appears on screen.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (To camera.) The witches of Devilís End, the famous curse, the notorious cavern underneath the church where the third Lord of...

(FERGUS turns. Another cameraman faces him from another direction. FERGUS walks down a small series of steps onto the floor of the cavern.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: ...Aldbourne played at his eighteen-century parody of black magic. Devilís End is part of the dark mythology of our childhood days. And now, for the first time, the cameras of the BBC have been allowed inside the cavern itself.

(FERGUS walks round the cavern as he talks. The whole area resembles a normal crypt of a church but the area has been used for a darker purpose in the past. In the recesses, instead of tombs, are illuminated displays of witches and the history of the cavern for tourists.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: In this cavern, pagan man performed his unspeakable rites. In this cavern, the witches of the seventeenth century hid from the fires of Matthew Hopkins, witch-hunter extraordinary. In this cavern,...huh, but I could go on all day.

(FERGUS has reached the strangest object of all - a stone horned gargoyle which sits on a plynth, cross legged with its chin in its hands. FERGUS lays his hand on its shoulder.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (To camera.) There is...something strange about Devilís End.

(FERGUS moves on from the gargoyle.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (To camera.) Is Professor Horner being as...ĒfoolishĒ as his critics would suggest? Huh, I must admit, standing here in this...unquiet place, Iím beginning to wonder myself.


6: EXT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW

(Outside the Devilís Hump, FERGUS faces another camera. HARRY holds up his hand for silence...)

HARRY: Quiet please!

(...and brings his arm down, giving FERGUS his cue to start.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: While I was recording that earlier this afternoon, the archaeological dig was proceeding apace. Professor Horner and his team have cut their way into the ďDevilís HumpĒ - as this barrow is called by the locals - as if it were a giant pie. But now the question is can Professor Horner pull out his plum!

(FERGUS gives an oily laugh at his own joke. He is disturbed by a portly man, wearing a suit and a pork pie hat who is stood nearby. He speaks in a Yorkshire accent, rich in cynicism.)

PROF. HORNER: Get on with it, man...

(FERGUS looks at the man - PROF. HORNER himself.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: Or will the Professor be proved disastrously wrong?


7: INT. UNIT HQ. DUTY ROOM

(The live broadcast continues on a black and white television set in the duty room of UNIT HQ. A pair of bunk-beds stand against one wall and a coffee machine is against another. Sat at a table with two phones, engrossed in the programme is SERGEANT BENTON.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (On television.) For some two hundred years, the controversy has raged - What is the Devilís Hump. Now, weíre not the first to try and find out. But from 1793, when Sir Percival Flintís miners ran back to Cornwall leaving him for dead to the famous Cambridge University fiasco of 1939...

(JO, the DOCTOR and MIKE walk in.)

JO: Has it started yet?
SERGEANT BENTON: ___.
DOCTOR: Shh, shh. Letís see what he has to say.

(JO sits down with the DOCTOR and MIKE stood behind her.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (On television.) ___ has remained an enigma. Er, but tonight, the enigma will be solved. Tonight...


8: EXT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (To camera.) ...at midnight, the witching hour, viewers of BBC3 will have the privilege of being present when Professor Gilbert Horner, the noted archeologist...

(HORNER steps into view.)

PROF. HORNER: Got round to me at last, have you? About time too!
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Er, not yet, Professor, not yet.

(HORNER ignores FERGUS and gestures at the cameraman.)

PROF. HORNER: Hey you! Bring that camera over here, would you? Come on!
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Er...

(HORNER walks down the canvas entrance into the barrow as FERGUS gives a sickly and embarrassed laugh. He nevertheless gestures to the cameraman himself and follows HORNER in. The camera follows...)


9: INT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW

(HORNER goes up to a large round stone which is the final block to the entrance to the barrow.)

PROF. HORNER: There - thatís the spot. Six inches behind there lies the greatest archeological find this country has known since Sutton Hoo.
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Er, would you like to explain that reference, Professor?
PROF. HORNER: No, and at midnight tonight...

(FERGUS turns to the camera.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: Sutton Hoo, of course...
PROF. HORNER: (Interrupting.) Never mind about Sutton Hoo.

(He points at the stone.)

PROF. HORNER: This is what your precious viewers are interested in - the ďDevilís HumpĒ and whatís inside it - right?
ALASTAIR FERGUS: And what is inside it?
PROF. HORNER: Treasure, thatís what. The tomb of a great warrior chieftain, bronze age, 800BC.
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Er, youíre very precise?
PROF. HORNER: No need to take my word for it - see for yourself, midnight.
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Ah yes, now then, why midnight and why tonight?
PROF. HORNER: Well, itís obvious - April 30th is Beltane, isnít it?
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Beltane?
PROF. HORNER: You know, you ought to have done your homework before you came on this dig.

(FERGUS manages to keep his temper.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: Er, for the viewers, Professor.
PROF. HORNER: April 30th - Beltane - greatest occult festival of the year, bar Halloween.


10: INT. UNIT HQ. DUTY ROOM

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (On television.) Well, frankly, Iím not much wiser.

(The DOCTOR looks worried...)

DOCTOR: (To himself.) Beltane! Of course!

(JO notices his concern.)

PROF. HORNER: (On television.) Youíve heard the tales about this place? The ghosts, the witches, the curse - the famous curse?
ALASTAIR FERGUS: (On television.) But you donít believe that, do you? Well then, why have you...?
PROF. HORNER: (On television.) My new book comes out tomorrow.

(FERGUSí tone becomes tired as he realises that he and his crew have been had.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (On television.) Oh, then itís what one might call a publicity gimmick?
PROF. HORNER: (On television.) Top of the class, lad!
ALASTAIR FERGUS: (On television.) And youíre not concerned of your colleagues to ___?

(The DOCTOR voices a concern.)

DOCTOR: You know, thereís something dreadfully wrong here.
JO: Hey, you really mean that, donít you?
PROF. HORNER: (On television.) Oh, theyíll react the same way as always - ___ green.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (To the DOCTOR.) Well, what could be wrong?
ALASTAIR FERGUS: (On television.) But surely, if you...
DOCTOR: (To CAPTAIN YATES.) I donít know.

(He paces the room, desperately trying to make sense of his concerns, seemingly unaware that a strident feminine tone is now coming from the television.)

DOCTOR: (To himself.) Aquarius? The Devilís Hump? Beltane?
MISS HAWTHORNE: (On television.) ___ of course I know youíre on the air. Thatís why Iím here!
DOCTOR: Come on, think, think!

(BENTON points at the television.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Doctor look! Somethingís going on.

(On the television, the view has returned to outside the barrow. HARRY is shown attempting to restrain a scarved MISS HAWTHORN but she casually clubs him with her umbrella.)

MISS HAWTHORNE: (On television.) Get your hands off me, young man! Let me go!


11: EXT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW

(FERGUS and HORNER step outside the barrow.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: Okay, Harry.
MISS HAWTHORNE: Iíve come here to protest and protest I shall.

(FERGUS turns to the camera.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: Er, this is Miss Hawthorne, a prominent local resident whoís very much opposed to Professor Hornerís dig. (To HORNER.) Er, Professor Horner, I believe you two have already met?
PROF. HORNER: Iíll say - the daft womanís been pestering me for weeks!
MISS HAWTHORNE: (Contemptuously.) Iíve been trying to make you see reason.
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Miss Hawthorn, why are you opposed to this dig?
MISS HAWTHORNE: Because this man is tampering with forces he does not understand.
PROF. HORNER: Oh, come on now!
MISS HAWTHORNE: Youíll bring destruction on yourself and upon the whole area if you persist!
PROF. HORNER: Pish!
MISS HAWTHORNE: Death and disaster await you! Believe me, I know!

(FERGUS smiles into the camera.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: Er, but thatís just it - why should we believe you and how do you know?
MISS HAWTHORNE: Iím a witch.

(She speaks as if the answer is blindingly obvious. FERGUS gives a nervous laugh.)

PROF. HORNER: You see? I told you she was daft!
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Miss Hawthorne, you donít really mean to...
MISS HAWTHORNE: I tell you Iím a witch!
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Wha...wha...
MISS HAWTHORNE: (Interrupting.) Well, white, of course...
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Ah...
MISS HAWTHORNE: ...but that is why you should listen to me - I know!
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Well, thank you very much, Miss Hawthorn, for a most interesting...
MISS HAWTHORNE: (Interrupting.) Iíve cast the runes. Iíve consulted the talisman of mercury. Itís written in the stars.

(Her voice takes on a quiet note of danger and warning...)

MISS HAWTHORNE: ďWhen Beltane is come, tread softly. For lo, the prince himself is nigh...Ē and tonight is Beltane!
PROF. HORNER: You see? Mad as a hatter!

(He steps away.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (To MISS HAWTHORNE.) Er, ďthe princeĒ?
MISS HAWTHORNE: The prince of evil, the dark one, the horned beast!

(She holds up a hand with the index and little fingers raised as a sign of protection.)


12: INT. UNIT HQ. DUTY ROOM

(The DOCTOR has seen enough. He makes for the door.)

DOCTOR: Come on, Jo.
JO: Where to?
DOCTOR: Devilís End, of course. That woman is perfectly right - weíve got to stop that lunatic before itís too late!

(He strides out. JO gives a look back to MIKE and SERGEANT BENTON and then follows. MIKE shrugs at his fellow soldier and sits down to watch the end of the broadcast.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (On television.) Miss Hawthorne, Professor Horner, thank you. So...


13: EXT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW

(MISS HAWTHORNEíS voice carries on in protest in the background as FERGUS winds up the transmission...)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (To camera.) There we are - it seems that time is running out in more ways than one. What is going to happen here at midnight? Why not tune in to BBC3 and 11.45 tonight and find out? Until then, from me, itís goodbye now. Alastair Fergus, ďThe Passing ParadeĒ, Devilís End.Ē


14: INT. ďTHE CLOVEN HOOFĒ. MAIN BAR

(In the bar of the pub, the television is switched off. The regulars have been watching the broadcast of the events of their own village. DR. REEVES stands at the bar together with WINSTANLEY, the local Squire - a portly white haired man - and TOM GIRTON, a younger dark haired man. BERT THE LANDLORD, a middle-aged man stands behind the bar. The men all laugh. Other regulars stand behind them in the crowded bar.)

WINSTANLEY: Good for Miss Hawthorne! She kept her end up pretty well!

(BERT makes a noise of derision.)

BERT THE LANDLORD: The womanís round the twist if you ask me - always has been.
TOM GIRTON: Er, youíre right Bert. Should have been put away years ago.
WINSTANLEY: Oh, Iím not so sure she hasnít got a point.

(GIRTON chokes on his pint and stares at the Squire.)

WINSTANLEY: Broadly speaking, you know.
TOM GIRTON: What? All that stuff about death and disaster? Well, youíre not telling me you believe it, Mr. Winstantley?
WINSTANLEY: Well, no. But there have been a lot of queer goings-on the last few weeks.

(WINSTANLEY faces the regulars in the rest of the pub who all listen to his words.)

WINSTANLEY: Strange sudden noises and, er, gasts, er, gusts of wind, and poor old Jim dropping down in the churchyard.
BERT THE LANDLORD: (Mocking.) Yeah, Frank was telling me his cows have gone dry...and my wifeís hens have stopped laying.

(REEVES and GIRTON laugh but WINSTANLEY remains serious.)

WINSTANLEY: Yes, and all since they started digging up there on Devilís Hump.
BERT THE LANDLORD: Could just be a coincidence, you know?
TOM GIRTON: Ah, weíve had a spell of bad weather. Always upsets things that does.
WINSTANLEY: Yes, but just suppose sheís right, eh? How about that, Bert?
BERT THE LANDLORD: (Smiles.) Well, Iíll tell you - if the oldín does come along here tonight, he can have my best room - my bread and butter, he is!

(His regulars all laugh.)


15: EXT. VILLAGE STREET

(The village bobby - PC GROOM - walks out of his cottage and shuts the door. He walks to the gate to collect his bicycle, turns and sees MISS HAWTHORNE walking past his cottage.)

PC GROOM: Good evening, Miss Hawthorne, Saw you on the television just now. Very good I thought you were.
MISS HAWTHORNE: They chopped me! Cut me off! Donít you worry, Constable, Iíll get my chance later tonight - youíll see!

(PC GROOM smiles at her and she walks on. In an instant, a howling demonic winds strikes up, blasting at MISS HAWTHORNE. Behind her, PC GROOM puts his fingers to his ears as if in pain. MISS HAWTHORNE balances herself against the wind, raises her hands to the air and starts an incantation...)

MISS HAWTHORNE: Avaunt all ye elementals!

(PC GROOM, possessed, picks up with both hands a large rock from his garden and starts to walk towards MISS HAWTHORNE with it.)

MISS HAWTHORNE: Avaunt all ye powers of adversity!

(PC GROOM nears her, the rock raised over high. MISS HAWTHORNEíS words are lost over the noise of the wind but as the policeman gets up close behind her, her words start to have an effect. The wind dies down and with it she lowers her arms. As if by signal, GROOMíS hands lower at the same time in perfect synchrony.)

MISS HAWTHORNE: Be still and return to thy resting. Be at peace in thy sleeping...

(She sighs and turns round to see a dazed and confused PC GROOM still holding the rock.)

MISS HAWTHORNE: Mr. Groom? Mr. Groom, are you all right?
PC GROOM: Yes, I...I think so. I...I just felt a bit faint for a moment or two.
MISS HAWTHORNE: Iím not at all surprised. Not at all. (Smiles.) Itíll pass, Mr. Groom, itíll pass.
PC GROOM: Iím feeling a lot better now already, thank you.
MISS HAWTHORNE: We must be on our guard, all of us.

(She clutches her green cloak and walks off.)


16: EXT. COUNTRY LANE

(The DOCTOR and JO in Bessie shoot down a lane.)


17: EXT. CROSSROADS

(Ahead of them, a finger post in the crossroads points in four different directions - one of them towards Devilís End which is three miles away. The same demonic wind strikes up and the post starts to revolve round at speed until it comes to a stop with the sign for Devilís End pointing in totally the wrong direction. Its job done, the wind dies down - just as Bessie comes into view. The car hesitates and then drives on in the incorrect direction indicated.)


18: EXT. CHURCHYARD

(MISS HAWTHORNE strides through the churchyard. As she steps down a rise towards the vicarage, she jumps as she almost walks into a black garbed figure that stand before her - the Verger GARVIN.)

MISS HAWTHORNE: Oh!
GARVIN: What do you want?
MISS HAWTHORNE: How dare you jump out at me like that! Out of my way, please.
GARVIN: (Insistent.) What do you want?
MISS HAWTHORNE: Well, if you must know, I wish to contact the vicar.
GARVIN: Mr. Magisterís not in at the moment.
MISS HAWTHORNE: Not him - I mean the real vicar.
GARVIN: (Smiles.) What would you call Mr. Magister then?
MISS HAWTHORNE: I mean Canon Smallwood - our old vicar. The one who left in such mysterious circumstances.
GARVIN: Nothing mysterious about it. Taken ill and had to leave.
MISS HAWTHORNE: Suddenly? In the middle of the night? Without so much as a goodbye to anyone in the village?

(GARVIN crosses his arms but doesnít move out of the way.)

GARVIN: Iíve got no time to listen to your nonsense. Iíve got my work to do.
MISS HAWTHORNE: Very well then. Iíll see the other gentleman. I cannot say that I like him but he is at least a man of the cloth.
GARVIN: (Menacingly.) I told you, didnít I? Heís not in.
MISS HAWTHORNE: Well, I intend to find that out for myself. Let me pass please.

(She tries to push past him but he stands immobile.)

GARVIN: Youíre wasting your time.
MISS HAWTHORNE: If you donít stand out of my way, Garvin, I shall be forced to use violence.

(A gentle voice calms the situation as the vicar steps forward.)

MASTER: Dear me, I hope that violence will not be necessary.

(Dressed in a vicarís suit, complete with dog collar and black rimmed spectacles, the village vicar is the MASTER.)

MASTER: Good evening, Miss Hawthorne, and, er, what can I do for you?


19: INT. UNIT HQ. DUTY ROOM

(SERGEANT BENTON puts the phone down in disgust as CAPTAIN YATES gets a drink out of the dispenser.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Well, thatís made a mess of my evening!

(The door to the room opens and the BRIGADIER walks in, dressed in red-jacketed regimental dress.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Everything in order, Yates?

(BENTON stands.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Yes sir. No problems.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: All right, Benton. (To YATES.) Right, and Iím off. You know where to reach me if anything crops up.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Yes sir.

(YATES looks at BENTON and smiles.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Have a good evening, sir.

(The BRIGADIER, leaving the room, senses the mockery and turns in the doorway.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Thank you, Captain Yates. Goodnight.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: ĎNight, sir.
SERGEANT BENTON: Goodnight, sir.

(He walks out and a UNIT corporal closes the door and then puts a plate of sandwiches in front of BENTON.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Itís all right for some, isnít it, sir? And weíre stuck here with a television and a plate of...

(BENTON examines the contents of the plate.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Corned beef sandwiches!


20: EXT. CHURCHYARD

(MISS HAWTHORNE pleads with the MASTER while GARVIN stands sullenly nearby.)

MISS HAWTHORNE: I beg you to help me, Mr. Magister. Help me to stop that foolhardy man!
MASTER: You mean the Professor? But surely...
MISS HAWTHORNE: (Interrupting.) He must not enter the tomb - tonight of all nights!
MASTER: Why ever not?
MISS HAWTHORNE: Beltane. The forces of evil are abroad tonight.
MASTER: Really, Miss Hawthorne, as a rational man, I...
MISS HAWTHORNE: (Interrupting, passionately.) We are all in mortal peril, Vicar! Have you no concern for the souls in your care?
MASTER: The soul as such is a very dated concept. Er, viewing the matter existentially, I...
MISS HAWTHORNE: Existentially? Oh, youíre a blockhead!

(She turns to go. The MASTER puts a hand on her arm.)

MASTER: Miss Hawthorne, one moment. Youíre very distressed, I can see that. You know, you really are worrying unduly.

(He takes off his glasses and stares hypnotically at her.)

MASTER: Thereís nothing to worry about. You must believe me. You must believe me.

(MISS HAWTHORNE stares back, gripped by his mesmeric force...)

MISS HAWTHORNE: Must...believe...

(She shakes her head and gets a grip of herself.)

MISS HAWTHORNE: Oh, why should I believe you? A rationalist, existentialist priest indeed!
MASTER: (Angrily.) Listen to me!
MISS HAWTHORNE: Youíre a fool, sir! If you wonít help me, I must find someone who will!

(She holds up the talisman around her neck, almost as a protection against the evil of the MASTER. He recoils from it and she stalks off. The MASTER stares in fury at her retreating figure, then snaps his fingers at GARVIN. The verger runs forward and the MASTER points at the MISS HAWTHORNE as she walks through the churchyard. The Verger needs no second bidding and starts to run after the lady...)


21: EXT. ROAD (NIGHT)

(Night has fallen and Bessie comes to a fork in the road and stops. JO has a map in her hands and a torch to read it with.)

DOCTOR: Itís no good, weíre hopelessly lost!
JO: I canít understand it. We followed the sign posts all right.
DOCTOR: Well, if we had, we would have been there by now. You must have missed one.
JO: I did not!

(The DOCTOR looks at the map in her hands, snatches it and turns it round before handing it back.)

DOCTOR: If you look at the map the right way up, we might eventually get there! Now, which way is it.
JO: Erm...

(She traces their position on the map and points to the left.)

JO: ...that way.
DOCTOR: Thank you very much!

(They move off again in the direction indicated.)


22: EXT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW (NIGHT)

(The barrow is a hive of activity as the TV crew prepare for the midnight broadcast. ALASTAIR FERGUS paces nervously as a calm HARRY walks out of the canvas tunnel entrance.)

HARRY: You all right, Alastair?
ALASTAIR FERGUS: (Snaps.) Of course Iím all right! Why shouldnít I be, for Peteís sake?! Of all the stupid questions!
HARRY: Well, I only asked. Thereís no need to make a production number out of it.
ALASTAIR FERGUS: Iím sorry, Harry. Iím just a bit on edge. Iíll be all right.

(He walks off. HARRY sees HORNER sat nearby drinking a cup of tea and goes over to him.)

HARRY: Everything okay, Professor? Wonít be long now.
PROF. HORNER: Any sign of that fool woman?
HARRY: Not so far.
PROF. HORNER: Well, keep her away from me. Iíll tell you lad, Iíll do her a mischief.
HARRY: Do my best. Now, youíve got everything straight? We start with an intro from Alastair, then I give you a cue to launch into your speil...
PROF. HORNER: Speil?
HARRY: The chat bit, ďmomentous occasionĒ and all that?
PROF. HORNER: Oh aye.
HARRY: Tom says if you could break into the burial chamber as the church clock strikes the first stroke of midnight, that would be absolutely super.
PROF. HORNER: Right-oh lad, Iíll do my best to be ďabsolutely superĒ!

(HARRY is oblivious to the sarcasm and walks off giving him a thumbs up.)

PROF. HORNER: (Muttering.) Super...!

(HARRY is about to walk back into the barrow but a thought strikes him...)

HARRY: Professor?
PROF. HORNER: Mmm?
HARRY: Suppose something does happen?
PROF. HORNER: Like?
HARRY: Personal appearance of you-know-who?
PROF. HORNER: Well, use your initiative, lad.

(He points to the nearby figure of ALASTAIR.)

PROF. HORNER: Get your chatty friend over there to interview him!
HARRY: Of course! Why didnít I think of that?

(He goes into the barrow.)


23: INT. UNIT HQ. DUTY ROOM (NIGHT)

(BENTON is alone in the darkened duty room engrossed in a rugby match on the television.)

MATCH COMMENTATOR: (OOV: On television.) So, trying to run out of his own twenty-five, then inside to Neary...

(YATES comes in.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Anything happen yet?
SERGEANT BENTON: No sir, not a thing.
MATCH COMMENTATOR: (OOV: On television.) ...to Robinson who couldnít hold it.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Isnít it about time for the dig?
SERGEANT BENTON: Just about. This is highlights from the game at Twickenham.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Better turn over then.

(He goes towards the TV set but before he can reach the channel dial, an incident occurs in the match which annoys the SERGEANT.)

SERGEANT BENTON: Hey, did you see that?
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Quite right too!
MATCH COMMENTATOR: (OOV: On television.) ...a number of the Staffordshire county side.

(YATESí interest is now taken with the match and he forgets about changing channels, instead sitting nex to BENTON to watch the game.)

SERGEANT BENTON: As bad as the ref you are, sir!

(Something else occurs not to the SERGANTíS liking...)

SERGEANT BENTON: Oh no!
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Thatíll line them.


24: INT. ďTHE CLOVEN HOOFĒ. MAIN BAR (NIGHT)

(The pub is still crowded at closing time with the village regulars as the DOCTOR and JO burst in, the DOCTOR rudely pushing past two men to get to the bar.)

BERT THE LANDLORD: Come along now friends, drink up!

(The DOCTOR stands at the bar next to DR. REEVES and TOM GIRTON. The regulars stare at his strange appearance.)

BERT THE LANDLORD: Sorry sir, well past time.
DOCTOR: Yeah, thatís quite all right. We donít want a drink - just the directions to the Devilís Hump.
JO: Where the dig is.
BERT THE LANDLORD: Ah, youíre going up there are you? Itís all on telly, you know?
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, I know but, er, would you please tell us the way? This is very urgent.
BERT THE LANDLORD: (Smiles.) Always in such a hurry, you towns folk. All be the same in a hundred years time, sir!
DOCTOR: I can assure you, sir, it will be no such thing!

(WINSTANTLEY steps forward.)

WINSTANLEY: Are you one of these television chaps then?
DOCTOR: Er, I am no sort of ďchapĒ sir!
WINSTANLEY: Forgive me, but I thought...well, the costume and the wig, you know?
DOCTOR: (Snaps.) Wig?!
JO: (Calming.) Now, Doctor!
TOM GIRTON: What do you wanna go up the Hump for anyway?
DOCTOR: Look, there is no time for all these unnecessary questions...
BERT THE LANDLORD: All the time in the world, sir!
DOCTOR: I want to go up to the Devilís Hump because I want to stop that lunatic Professor of your from bringing devastation upon you all!
TOM GIRTON: (To WINSTANLEY.) Huh, one of Miss Hawthorneís brigade!

(And with that he walks out of the pub.)

DOCTOR: Is nobody here capable of answering a perfectly simple enquiry? Whatís the matter with you all?
WINSTANLEY: Youíre making all the fuss, old man.
DOCTOR: Fuss? Iíve never heard such balderdash in all...
JO: (Interrupting.) Doctor!

(JO turns on the charm for WINSTANLEY...)

JO: Look, could you please tell us the way?

(...and it works.)

WINSTANLEY: Yes, certainly. Straight past the green outside, fork left, straight up the rise and you canít miss it.
DOCTOR: (Smiles.) Excellent! Thank you very much!

(They start walking out.)

JO: Thank you. Goodbye.
WINSTANLEY: Extraordinary fellow!

(REEVES smiles but BERT looks perturbed...)


25: INT. CHURCH. VESTRY (NIGHT)

(GIRTON has made his way straight over to the church and is reporting events to the MASTER in the vestry.)

TOM GIRTON: White hair he had, and a sort of cloak.

(The MASTER flinches.)

MASTER: Did he by any chance call himself...Ēthe DoctorĒ?
TOM GIRTON: Thatís right! Itís what the girl called him! How did you know that?

(The MASTERíS face darkens...)

MASTER: Itís of no importance.

(He snaps his fingers at GARVIN for him to leave.)

MASTER: Well Girton, youíve...youíve done very well.

(He points at GIRTON colourful checked jacket.)

MASTER: But, er, why arenít you ready?
TOM GIRTON: Well, I thought I should tell you. He said he was going to stop the dig.
MASTER: Well, youíd better hurry and change. We start the ceremony in a few minutes.

(He shows GIRTON through another door which has a sign on it which reads ďTO THE CAVERNĒ. The MASTER himself goes into a gated area of the vestry and opens a cupboard. From it he takes a bright red silken cloak, decorated with a black and gold collar and a gold chain with a mystical talisman as a decoration.)


26: INT. CHURCH. CAVERN (NIGHT)

(Dressed in the cloak, the MASTER walks down the steps into the cavern. Several black cloaked and hooded coven members are preparing for a sabbat, carrying a old altar stone into place. The MASTER walks round the back of the cavern, looking meaningfully at the seated stone gargoyle. He then walks up to the altar stone as coven members walk forward with a ceremonial urn and other accoutrements for the ceremony.)


27: EXT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW (NIGHT)

(The broadcast is about to start...)

HARRY: (Shouts.) Quiet please! Lots of lovely hush!

(The response is not as fast as he would wish for...)

HARRY: (Yells.) Quiet!

(The area grows quieter. ALASTAIR FERGUS is getting a last minute touch-up of his make-up. The lady finishes and FERGUS looks into the camera with a sickly smile.)

HARRY: Stand by...on the studio announcement now. Good luck, Tom.

(HARRY brings down his arm for the cue for FERGUS to begin.)

ALASTAIR FERGUS: (To camera.) Welcome back, viewers. And here at the Devilís Hump, the excitement is intense. The stage it set. What shall we see when the curtain rises?


28: EXT. ROAD (NIGHT)

(Bessie speeds along a darkened road.)


29: INT. CHURCH. CAVERN (NIGHT)

(The altar has been set with the implements for the sabbat. A row of black candles sits along the altar and the MASTER stands over the small urn into which he has thrown some phosphorus material, causing a flare to rise upwards. The coven stands in a perfect circle around the altar.)

MASTER: As my will, so mote it be.
COVEN: Nema.

(The MASTER picks up a small bowl and sprinkles water three times on the altar. He then holds his hands aloft.)

MASTER: Hearken to my voice, oh dark one. Ancient and awful, supreme in artifice, bearer of power, I conjure thee - be present here at my command and truly do my will.

(His voice rises...)

MASTER: Aba, Abara, Agarbara, Gad, Gadoal, Galdina!
COVEN: Io Evohe!

(The MASTER takes another piece of phosphorescent material and holds it over the urn.)

MASTER: As my will, so mote it be!

(He drops it in and it flares upwards.)


30: EXT. ROAD (NIGHT)

(Bessie tears along the road but JO gives a warning shouts as ahead of them, a branch falls across the road, seemingly by itself and blocking their path. The car comes to a stop and they get out to try and move the obstruction.)

DOCTOR: Itís no good, weíre just wasting time, come on! Run ___.

(He grabs her hand and they run on.)


31: INT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW (NIGHT)

(HORNER sits next to the entrance stone to the barrow under the light of some small arc lamps. He speaks into the camera.)

PROF. HORNER: Letís face it - youíve had enough blather from tíother feller! You want to see for yourself. Well, Iíll tell you what youíre gonna see - a stone wall.

(At the base of the stone, he scrapes away some earth.)

PROF. HORNER: There you are. What did I tell you? Iím not daft!


32: INT. CHURCH. CAVERN (NIGHT)

(The coven circle the altar, chanting ďEoh evotehĒ as the MASTER stands, hands raised upwards, outside the circle, chanting his own incantation.)

MASTER: Ogoteruss awbm, Aleht tnewy ramahe, Ehwy revedna wonssa, Etih swawec stahn, Bmaltlttiladahy ram!
COVEN: Io Evohe!

(The MASTER holds his arms aloft as the coven stand still.)

MASTER: Eko, eko, Azal!
COVEN: Eko, eko, Azal!

(The MASTER walks up to the urn and drops in another burning phosphorescent object.)


33: INT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW (NIGHT)

(HORNER continues to scrape at the stone.)


34: EXT. FIELD (NIGHT)

(The DOCTOR sprints towards the dig as the midnight chimes of the distant church sound out. JO runs behind, desperately trying to keep up.)

DOCTOR: Stop! Stop that dig!

(JO falls over and struggles to her feet as the DOCTOR continues onwards.)

DOCTOR: Stop it!


35: INT. CHURCH. CAVERN (NIGHT)

(The coven stand with joined arms round the altar. Smoke and incense fill the cavern.)

MASTER: By the power of earth, by the power of air, by the power of fire eternal and the waters of the deep, I conjure thee and charge thee Azal - arise, arise at my command, Azal! Azal!
COVEN: Azal!


36: INT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW (NIGHT)

(The DOCTOR runs into the barrow.)

DOCTOR: Stop! Donít pull that stone! Donít!

(But he is too late. HORNER pulls the stone away and immediately a howling, freezing ice-filled wind pours out of the barrow. The DOCTOR and HORNER fall down under the blast.)


37: EXT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW (NIGHT)

(The wind screams out of the barrow, knocking the TV crew backwards. The ground shakes as FERGUS desperately tries to keep on his feet. Tables, chairs and arc-lamps go flying. HARRY and a cameraman fall to the ground.)


38: INT. CHURCH. CAVERN (NIGHT)

(The wind also fills the cavern. As the coven members falls to the ground, only the MASTER keeps to his feet, his face lit with pleasure as he laughs exultantly.)

MASTER: Azal!

(GIRTON, using a pillar for support sees something on the other side of the cavern and points.)

TOM GIRTON: Look!

(The gargoyleís head turns and its eyes are glowing bright red - it is coming to life!)


39: EXT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW (NIGHT)

(JO struggles through the wind and into the canvas entrance.)


40: INT. DEVILíS HUMP BARROW

(She looks at the figures on the ground.)

JO: Doctor! Are you...are you all right?

(PROF. HORNER and the DOCTOR lie quite still, covered in ice. As the barrow shakes, part of the roof starts to come down.)

JO: Doctor! No! Doctor! Oh no!


Next Episode


Doctor Who
JON PERTWEE

Brigadier Lethbridge Stewart
NICHOLAS COURTNEY

The Master
ROGER DELGADO

Jo Grant
KATY MANNING

Captain Mike Yates
RICHARD FRANKLIN

Sergeant Benton
JOHN LEVENE

Miss Hawthorne
DAMARIS HAYMAN

Bert the Landlord
DON McKILLOP

Winstanley
ROLLO GAMBLE

Prof. Horner
ROBIN WENTWORTH

Alastair Fergus
DAVID SIMEON

Harry
JAMES SNELL

Garvin
JOHN JOYCE

Dr. Reeves
ERIC HILLYARD

Tom Girton
JON CROFT

PC Groom
CHRISTOPHER WRAY

Title Music by
RON GRAINER and
BBC RADIOPHONIC WORKSHOP

Incidental Music
DUDLEY SIMPSON

Special Sound
BRIAN HODGSON and
BBC RADIOPHONIC WORKSHOP

Film Cameraman
FRED HAMILTON

Film Sound
DICK MANTON

Film Editor
CHRIS WIMBLE

Visual Effects
PETER DAY

Costumes
BARBARA LANE

Makeup
JAN HARRISON

Studio Lighting
RALPH WALTON

Sound
TONY MILLIER

Script Editor
TERRANCE DICKS

Designer
ROGER FORD

Producer
BARRY LETTS

Directed by
CHRISTOPHER BARRY

COLOUR

© BBC 1971

 

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