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THE MIND
OF EVIL

BY
DON
HOUGHTON

EPISODE ONE


1: EXT. STANGMOOR PRISON

(Bessie, carrying the DOCTOR and JO, drives along a road and approaches a thick-walled, grey stone gatehouse. The DOCTOR stops the car in front of the imposing closed wooden gates within the gatehouse and the two occupants look upwards at the imposing structure.)

JO: It looks like Dracula’s castle.
DOCTOR: Well you’re right about the castle bit. It used to be a fortress in the Middle Ages.

(The DOCTOR gets out of the car.)

JO: Doctor?
DOCTOR: Mmm?
JO: You’ll need this.

(She passes him a small wallet like object.)

DOCTOR: (Smiles.) Thanks Jo.

(The DOCTOR walks up and presses a bell push in the wall next to a sign that identifies the castle-like structure as “H.M. PRISON STANGMOOR”. He sees that JO is still looking anxiously at the building.)

DOCTOR: Smile Jo!
JO: (Startled.) What?
DOCTOR: You’re on camera!

(The DOCTOR points upward to where a security camera hangs on the wall, its lens trained on the new arrivals. The DOCTOR grins at her, steps back and starts waving childishly at the camera. JO smiles at his antics.)


2: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. DUTY ROOM

(Within the prison, SENIOR PRISON OFFICER GREEN and one of the PRISON OFFICERS stare in some disbelief at the image on their security monitor.)


3: EXT. STANGMOOR PRISON

(So intent is the DOCTOR on his performance that he fails to see the approach of another PRISON OFFICER. He stops in mid-wave when he suddenly becomes aware of the impassive official.)

DOCTOR: (Embarrassed.) Oh, good morning. Err...observers from UNIT. My admission pass.

(The DOCTOR holds up the small pass that JO handed him. The OFFICER checks the photographic pass over and then looks over to JO, still sat in Bessie, who shows him her pass. He then speaks into a small walkie-talkie.)

PRISON OFFICER: Right, passes checked and satisfactory. Right, open the gates.

(The OFFICER walks off without a word. The DOCTOR joins JO in Bessie muttering as he does so...)

DOCTOR: Abandon hope all ye who enter here!

(The two drive through the opened gates, underneath a raised barrier and into the prison. The gates slam shut behind them.)


4: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. MAIN GALLERY

(Within the brick walled prison gallery there is near bedlam. Prisoners bang on the cell doors with any objects they can find. PRISON OFFICERS try to calm the situation. On the ground landing, CHIEF PRISON OFFICER POWERS approaches his subordinate as he runs out of one of the side rooms.)

CHIEF PRISON OFFICER POWERS: Green! ___settle down. The Governor’s on his way.

(GREEN runs off to try and stop the racket. The PRISON GOVERNOR, plump dark haired Scot, walks out of a side door with another man - PROFESSOR KETTERING. POWERS salutes the GOVERNOR.)

PRISON GOVERNOR: Morning Chief, everything all right?
CHIEF PRISON OFFICER POWERS: Will be, sir.
PRISON GOVERNOR: Good, good,___.

(The GOVERNOR’S words are lost over the sound of the protest but he starts to ascend a metal staircase to the upper landing, followed by POWERS, KETTERING and a white-jacketed man - DR. SUMMERS.)

PRISON OFFICER: Keep that noise down!

(The row continues as the procession turns left on the upper landing and step through a barred gate that GREEN opens for them. As they are about to descend a staircase, KETTERING, a small graying man turns irritably to SUMMERS.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: Why do they always have to make that stupid row?
PRISONER GOVERNOR: It always happens when sentences are being carried out.


5: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. CELL

(CHIEF PRISON OFFICER POWERS opens an inspection hatch in a cell door and looks within. He opens the cell door and enters. Two OFFICERS within, playing drafts, stand up. The prisoner within the cell, BARNHAM, jumps up off his bed. Although a large and violent looking man, he has a look of fear on his face. The group enters the cell and the GOVERNOR addresses BARNHAM in an official tone.)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: George Patrick Barnham...
BARNHAM: (Shouts.) No, you’re not going to take me anywhere!
PRISONER GOVERNOR: _____by a court of law.
BARNHAM: (Shouts.) Get away from me!
PRISONER GOVERNOR: The time has come for that sentence to be carried out.
BARNHAM: (Shouts.) Go on! Get out! All of yer!
DR. SUMMERS: I’ll give him something to calm him.

(DR. SUMMERS places a medical briefcase on the bed but BARNHAM grabs it and throws it off.)

BARNHAM: You won’t give me nothing, mate! Get out! All of yer!
CHIEF PRISON OFFICER POWERS: Pack it in, Barnham, you’re just being stupid.
BARNHAM: You’re not going to get me out there!

(POWERS looks over to the two OFFICERS.)

CHIEF PRISON OFFICER POWERS: Get him!

(The two OFFICERS spring forward. There is a loud tussle but the prisoner is soon overpowered, protesting loudly...)

PRISON GOVERNOR: All right___!
BARNHAM: (Shouts.) ___, you’ll break me arm!

(...and is dragged from the cell.)


6: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. SIDE GALLERY

(BARNHAM is almost pulled up the staircase still shouting. GREEN opens the barred gate.)


7: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. CELL

(POWERS hands SUMMERS his medical briefcase which he has picked up off the floor and the two leave the cell.)


8: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. PROCESS THEATRE

(In a large white, clinical looking room off the main gallery a large group of suited people are gathered. Most sit on chairs, which are on all sides of the room. But some of the people are in the center of the room where there is another chair with straps built into it and a device like a dome hanging over it. This in turn is connected by wires to a machine, which rests next to the chair. It is has some controls and dials on the flat base and a perspex tube rising upwards out of the center, topped by a dome with a light on the front. The perspex tube would appear to be empty. SENIOR PRISON OFFICER GREEN opens one of the double doors to the room - the process theatre - and enters. The noise of the protest by the prisoners is reaching the people in the room and is making them noticeably nervous.)

SENIOR PRISON OFFICER GREEN: Sorry about the noise, ladies and gentlemen - just a temporary disturbance.

(JO walks over to where the DOCTOR is looking over a large bank of controls in one corner of the room.)

JO: Tell me about it...
SENIOR PRISON OFFICER GREEN: (To the people in the room.) Now if you’d like to take your seats.
JO: (To the DOCTOR.) It sounds like a full-scale riot.

(The DOCTOR looks over the observers as they take their seats.)

DOCTOR: Morbid lot of sensation seekers.

(He walks across the room…)

JO: Then why did you insist on coming here?
DOCTOR: Scientific curiosity, my dear.
JO: Oh yes!

(...and they take their seats on a front row of chairs. The DOCTOR throws his cloak back, inadvertently draping over the man sat next to him. He mutters an apology and turns to JO.)

DOCTOR: Something’s been worrying me about this Keller process ever since I first heard about it.

(The door to the process theatre opens.)

DOCTOR: Oh, the curtain is about to go up.

(The GOVERNOR, KETTERING and POWERS enter. The latter goes up to GREEN and speaks quietly to him.)

CHIEF PRISON OFFICER POWERS: Mr. Green, ____wing, keep quiet.
SENIOR PRISON OFFICER GREEN: All right chief.

(He leaves the room as the GOVERNOR stands in front of the seated observers.)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: Ladies and gentlemen, good morning.

(All mutter a reply except for the DOCTOR who loudly proclaims:)

DOCTOR: Good morning!

(The GOVERNOR quickly looks at the oddly dressed individual, coughs and carries on...)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: May I introduce Professor Kettering, who will explain the process you’re about to see demonstrated.

(KETTERING steps forward.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: Well, as you’re no doubt aware, we no longer execute our hardened criminals and killers. Modern society has progressed far beyond that primitive form of retribution. Today, science...
DOCTOR: (To JO.) It all depends what you mean by progress, doesn’t it?

(KETTERING is somewhat thrown by the DOCTOR’S rather loud side comment. He gives him a cold look and continues.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING:...science has abolished the hangman’s noose and substituted this infallible method. Professor Emil Keller...
DOCTOR: (To JO.) People who go on about infallibility are usually on very shaky ground, I think!

(Again, KETTERING is thrown. He goes and stands directly in front of the DOCTOR.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: For the benefit of the less sophisticated members of my audience, I will explain in very simple terms!

(The DOCTOR gives JO a rueful look. KETTERING goes over to the machine in the center of the room.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: Professor Emil Keller, the inventor of this process, discovered that anti-social behavior was governed by certain negative or “evil” impulses. Now this machine - the Keller machine - extracts these impulses and leaves a rational, well-balanced individual. Because...
DOCTOR: (To JO.) It doesn’t.
JO: What?
PROFESSOR KETTERING: (To the DOCTOR.) May I be permitted to continue?
DOCTOR: (Unfazed.) Oh yes...yes, please do!
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Thank you. The condemned man is placed here... (He indicates the chair.) ...after being tranquillized with his head under this dome. A series of probes are attached to his skull so as to connect with the neural circuits.

(He walks over to the bank of controls that the DOCTOR was looking over earlier.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: The extraction process...is controlled here. The negative impulses are stored in that reservoir box there.

(He points to the upright perspex tube in the device next to the chair.)

DOCTOR: And where do they go after that?
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Nowhere sir. I repeat they are stored in the box.
DOCTOR: Which is now full of these negative or evil impulses.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Not full. The indicator registers only sixty-five percent at this time.

(POWERS opens the door to the theatre and two white-coated orderlies wheel in BARNHAM on a trolley. SUMMERS follows.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: The machine has been used very successfully in Switzerland. A hundred and twelve cases have been processed to date and today we shall witness the one hundred and thirteenth. Thank you, Doctor Summers.
DR. SUMMERS: Come on, old chap, up you get.

(The two orderlies assist the sedated BARNHAM off the trolley and into the chair. As SUMMERS connects a wired skullcap emanating from the dome to BARNHAM’S head, KETTERING continues his lecture.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: Err, when the process is completed the negative impulses that made this man a criminal will have been removed. He will take his place as a useful - if lowly - member of society. Are you ready, Doctor summers?
DR. SUMMERS: Yes.

(KETTERING adjust a control on the Keller machine and then walks over to the control bank. The DOCTOR leans forward - a look of concern on his face. KETTERING activates more controls, then nods at the GOVERNOR.)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: Let the sentence of the court been carried out.

(KELLER switches the device on. The lights in the room darken, lights in the Keller machine start flashing and a variable buzzing sound starts to fill the room. Suddenly BARNHAM screams in pain. Everybody in the room jumps.)

DOCTOR: (To JO.) I knew there was something evil about that machine!
DR. SUMMERS: Kettering! Look at the dial.

(KETTERING runs over to where SUMMERS is looking at a dial on the front of the Keller machine.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: What of it?
DR. SUMMERS: It’s never registered so high before.

(As KETTERING runs back over to the control bank and starts frantically to adjust controls, SUMMERS examines BARNHAM through his stethoscope.)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: Mr. Kettering, what’s happening?

(KETTERING manages to reduce the power of the machine and the lights in the room return to normal.)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: Well?
PROFESSOR KETTERING: A minor malfunction. The machine compensated.

(SUMMERS nods to KETTERING.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: The process is completed satisfactorily.
DOCTOR: (To JO.) Satisfactorily be blowed!
PROFESSOR KETTERING: The subject will be taken away to recuperate and within an hour or two he will be perfectly normal.
DOCTOR: I admire your confidence, sir.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Thank you. That is all, gentlemen.

(The observers in the room get up and start to leave - except for the DOCTOR and JO who walk over and join the GOVERNOR and KETTERING.)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: I take it everything was all right, Mr. Kettering.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Yes, of course, Governor.
DOCTOR: Then would you kindly explain, sir, that unfortunate man’s reaction?
PROFESSOR KETTERING: (Without looking up.) An excess of negative particles. The machine overreacted.
DOCTOR: In other words - you don’t know.

(KETTERING turns and faces the DOCTOR.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: May I ask who you are, sir?
PRISONER GOVERNOR: The Doctor is scientific advisor to UNIT, Mr. Kettering.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: UNIT?
PRISONER GOVERNOR: United Nations Intelligence Taskforce.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: How interesting, though I fail to see what concern it is...
DOCTOR: (Interrupting.) UNIT, sir, was set up to deal with new and unusual menaces to mankind - and in my view, this machine of yours is just that!

(He gives KETTERING a hard look.)

DOCTOR: Jo.

(They walk out, leaving a worried looking KETTERING behind.)


9: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. MEDICAL WING

(In the hospital, BARNHAM lies unconscious in bed, linked to a monitoring machine. SUMMERS takes a reading.)

DR. SUMMERS: Right.

(He picks up a clipboard and is making a note when KETTERING enters the room, looking concerned.)

PROFESSOR KETTERING: Well?
DR. SUMMERS: Nothing much wrong physically. Respiration normal, pulse rates a little high but that’s usual after the process.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: (Relaxing.) Ah, exactly. A completely successful treatment.
DR. SUMMERS: (Looking in BARNHAM’S eyes.) The reaction was unusually violent.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Really, my dear Summers, you’re as bad as that interfering fool from UNIT.

(A phone rings.)

DR. SUMMERS: Excuse me.

(SUMMERS goes into a side room and picks up the phone.)

DR. SUMMERS: (Into phone.) Medical wing? (He listens.) Yes? (He listens again.) What? (He listens.) Have you told the Governor? (He listens.) I’ll be right over.

(He walks out of the side-room, speaking to an orderly as he goes.)

DR. SUMMERS: Come with me.

(He makes for the door, speaking to another orderly who is with BARNHAM.)

DR. SUMMERS: You stay with the patient.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Anything the matter?
DR. SUMMERS: There’s been some kind of an accident in the process room. They think the man’s dead.

(KETTERING rushes after SUMMERS.)


10: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. PROCESS THEATRE

(In the process room, a young man lies dead on the floor. SENIOR PRISON OFFICER GREEN is examining him. He extracts his wallet and starts to look through it for identification. SUMMERS and his two companions enter the room.)

DR. SUMMERS: Who is he?
SENIOR PRISON OFFICER GREEN: I don’t know, sir.

(SUMMERS starts to examine the man as the GOVERNOR, the DOCTOR and JO enter.)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: What happened?
SENIOR PRISON OFFICER GREEN: I don’t know, sir. I was coming along the corridor and I heard him screaming.
DOCTOR: (To SUMMERS.) Is he dead?
DR. SUMMERS: (Sadly.) Yes...he’s dead.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Probably a heart attack - delayed shock from seeing the process.
DOCTOR: Perhaps...but I doubt it. (To SUMMERS.) Might I suggest an immediate investigation into his past medical history...and a post mortem.
DR. SUMMERS: Yes...yes, a good idea. I’ll see to it right away. (To the orderly.) Get a stretcher, will you?

(He leaves the room.)

JO: (Upset.) Doctor? Did you see his face? He looks terrified - and those...marks, like...
DOCTOR: Bites and scratches? Yes, I know.
JO: Look, I think we’d better get onto the Brigadier.
DOCTOR: Yes, I agree, Jo, but not just yet. Now, let me get that post mortem first. It’ll give me more to go on.

(He turns back to the body.)

JO: All right. Anyway, I don’t think he’d thank us for disturbing him right now.
DOCTOR: (Not really listening.) Mmm?
JO: He did tell you all about it, Doctor.
DOCTOR: (Puzzled.) All about what?
JO: (With some exasperation.) Today’s the first ever world peace conference. UNIT’s handling all the security arrangements.


11: INT. UNIT LONDON HQ. BRIGADIER’S OFFICE

(The BRIGADIER is on the telephone...)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Yes, that’s all very well, sir, but in my opinion...

(As he listens, there is a knock and CAPTAIN YATES enters, closing the double doors closed behind him.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Into phone.) Yes, I see, sir... (He listens.) ...of course, sir... (He listens.) ...I take it that is your final decision?... (He listens again.) ...very well, sir, goodbye.

(He puts the phone down.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Trouble, sir?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: That was the ministry. UNIT’ll be responsible for the safe transport of the missile. It’s been cleared with Geneva.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (Sighs.) Well, that’s all we needed. What with the peace conference on our hands as well.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Yes.

(He gets up and goes to a filing cabinet.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: I want you to take charge of this escort detail, Captain Yates. I’ve got quite enough on my plate as it is.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: I’ll get onto it right away.

(The BRIGADIER hands him a file and resumes his seat. YATES turns to leave.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Oh, is the Doctor back from Stangmoor yet?
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: No sir. Erm , what exactly is he doing down there?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Skeptically.) Observing new development in the treatment of criminals, I believe. Oh well, I suppose it will keep him out of mischief. By the way, how are things at the conference?

(Slightly upraised voices can be heard in the outer office.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Oh, all running smoothly, sir.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: I only hope it lasts.

(The doors burst open and a grim, unsmiling young Asiatic woman in the green uniform of the Chinese army enters the room, closely followed by a flustered CORPORAL BELL, the BRIGADIER’S secretary.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: All right, Corporal Bell.

(BELL leaves the room as CAPTAIN YATES carries forward a chair for the visitor. She ignores it and stands before the BRIGADIER’S desk.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Yes, Captain Chin Lee, what can I do for you?
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: Brigadier, an outrage has been committed against the Chinese people’s delegation. As you are in charge of security arrangements, we hold you directly responsible.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Patiently.) What is it now, Captain?
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: Important state documents have been stolen from General Cheng Teik’s suite.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: That’s impossible. There’s a twenty-four hour guard on all the delegate’s suites.
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: Nevertheless, the theft has occurred. Your guards are inefficient. Perhaps they take bribes?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Furious.) That is an insulting suggestion, Captain! I will not tolerate any...

(CHIN LEE stares impassively at him as he collects his temper...)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Very well, Captain, I’ll investigate the matter immediately.
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: I must warn you that this puts the success of the peace conference in grave jeopardy. We suspect the imperialist Americans of this crime.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Dryly.) Naturally. I assure that every effort will be made to locate the missing papers and punish whoever is responsible.
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: (Threatening.) Any further trouble and our delegation will withdraw from this conference.

(She storms out of the room.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: More trouble!
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Mmm, pity, she’s quite a dolly!


12: EXT. UNIT LONDON HQ

(CHIN LEE walks out of the town house which is serving as the London HQ but her whole demeanor has changed. Her threatening icy tone has disappeared and she now walks in a trance, past the open door of her car held for her by a puzzled chauffeur and into a park across the street where children are playing. She walks up to a litter bin in the park and, seemingly struggling with her actions, pulls a roll of documents from out of her tunic. She sets fire to them with a lighter and observes the gathering flame as a buzzing sound seems to fill her head. She throws the flaming paper into the bin, her facing slightly creasing with pain. She feels behind her right ear...where there is concealed a small round metallic device. The trance seems to take over her again and she walks away from the litterbin and its burning contents.)


13: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. PROCESS THEATRE

(The DOCTOR, KETTERING and the GOVERNOR enter the theatre. The body has been taken away.)

DOCTOR: But you are still convinced this Keller process is working normally?
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Yes, of course it is. I mean, you’ve just seen Barnham.
DOCTOR: Yes...yes, I’ve seen him.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Look, Emil Keller himself installed it here. I worked closely with him. I know every facet of the process.
DOCTOR: Yes, I know...but I still don’t like it.
PRISONER GOVERNOR: What?
DOCTOR: Interfering with the mind, Governor. It’s a dangerous business.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Well, it’s hardly your concern, is it?
DOCTOR: (Angrily.) Professor Kettering, it is everyone’s concern!
DR. SUMMERS: (OOV: Outside the room.) After you,___.

(JO and SUMMERS enter the room, the latter carrying a file.)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: Ah, Doctor Summers, any news for us?
DR. SUMMERS: I’ve got the post mortem report.
PROFESSOR KETTERING:: Well?
DR. SUMMERS: The deceased’s name was Arthur Linwood, a medical student in his final year...
DOCTOR: (Interrupting.) Yes, yes, yes, but what did he die of?
DR. SUMMERS: Heart failure.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: (Satisfied.) Watching the process was too much for him.
DR. SUMMERS: But he didn’t have a weak heart, Mr. Kettering.
DOCTOR: Anything in his medical history?
DR. SUMMERS: Yes, I called his hospital. He suffered from a fear of certain animals.
DOCTOR: Oh, which ones?
DR. SUMMERS: Well, apparently in the laboratory. He was absolutely terrified of...
DOCTOR: (Guessing.) Rats!
DR. SUMMERS: Yes...
DOCTOR: Yeah...tell me, these, err, these marks on his face on his face and neck, these bites and scratches, could they have been caused by rats?
DR. SUMMERS: Certainly they could, yes.
PRISONER GOVERNOR: (Indignant but puzzled.) But there are no rats in this room. There’s none in the entire prison.
DR. SUMMERS: Yet all the indications are that he was attacked by a hoard of them and...and the shock killed him.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: You must be mistaken.
DOCTOR: But Linwood is dead.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Because of heart failure!
DOCTOR: No, Professor Kettering, because of this machine.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: I tell you that man’s death had nothing to do with this machine, and if you were a scientist you’d understand!
DOCTOR: (Shouts furiously.) If I were a scientist?! Let me tell you sir that I am a scientist...and I have been for several thousand...!

(He stops himself before he says something that he would regret. He storms out of the room.)

DOCTOR: Jo...
PROFESSOR KETTERING: The man’s mad.
JO: On the contrary, sir, he happens to be a genius! (To the GOVERNOR.) I do wish you’d listen to him.

(She follows the DOCTOR.)

DR. SUMMERS: (To the GOVERNOR.) Victor?
PRISONER GOVERNOR: I think you’d better give this machine a thorough check, Professor Kettering.
PROFESSOR KETTERING: Yes, of course, Governor. But I assure you there’s no reason for anxiety.
PRISONER GOVERNOR: (Not convinced.) All the same, better safe than sorry, hmm?

(They leave a slightly chastened KETTERING behind as they exit the room.)


14: INT. UNIT LONDON HQ. OUTER OFFICE

(CAPTAIN YATES is on one phone, sticking pins in a map as he speaks. CORPORAL BELL has just taken another call as the BRIGADIER enters.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (Into phone.) I’ll give you the final security schedules just as soon as I’ve had a chance to clear them with the Brigadier.
CORPORAL BELL: (To the BRIGADIER.) A call for you on line one, sir.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Oh, put it through, will you?
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (Into phone.) Right, right, I’ll ring you back within twenty minutes.

(She transfers the call and answers another ringing phone as the BRIGADIER enters his office.)

CORPORAL BELL: (Into phone.) UNIT HQ? Oh, good morning, Captain...


15: INT. UNIT LONDON HQ. BRIGADIER’S OFFICE

CORPORAL BELL: (OOV: In outer office.) Yes, certainly Captain, I’m just___.

(The BRIGADIER answers his phone.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Lethbridge Stewart? (He listens.) I see...you’re sure?... (He listens.) ...very well, continue the search.

(He puts the phone down and speaks into an intercom.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Captain Yates, will you come in for a moment please?
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: (OOV: On intercom.) Yes sir.

(YATES enters the room.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Oh, sit down.

(He shuts the door behind him and does so.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Well, there’s no trace of Chin Lee’s missing papers. Our people have turned the place inside out. It wouldn’t surprise me if she lost them herself.

(BELL enters the room.)

CORPORAL BELL: Excuse me, sir. Captain Chin Lee on the phone. Do you want to speak to her?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (With a tired note in his voice.) Yes, I’ll speak to her.

(He reaches for a phone.)

CORPORAL BELL: Err, hotline, sir.

(He picks up another phone on his desk.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Oh, I wonder what she’s complaining of this time? (Into phone.) Yes, good afternoon, Captain Chin Lee, what can I do for you?

(A look of concern appears on his face and his manner becomes tense.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Into phone.) Yes, I see... (He listens.) ...no, don’t touch anything. I’ll be over at once.

(He puts the phone down.)

CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: More stolen papers, sir?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (Into intercom.) Get my car ready at once.
CORPORAL BELL: (OOV: Over intercom.) Right away, sir.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (To YATES.) We’ve got real trouble this time, the Chinese delegate’s dead.


16: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. PROCESS THEATRE

(Alone in the process theatre, KETTERING takes an inspection hatch off the front of the control bank at the side of the room. As he starts to inspect the wiring, an undulating noise starts to fill the room. KETTERING puts his hands to his ears in pain. He turns round and sees that the Keller machine seems to have come to life of its own accord.)


17: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. MAIN GALLERY

(SENIOR PRISON OFFICER GREEN is on patrol as noise and shouts from the locked-up prisoners starts to increase. The OFFICERS react...)

PRISON OFFICER: All right in there, keep the noise down.

(POWERS comes out of the duty room and shouts up to GREEN who is on the upper landing.)

CHIEF PRISON OFFICER POWERS: Starting up again, are they?
SENIOR PRISON OFFICER GREEN: Just like before, I don’t what it is.

(The prisoners become more restless and starting banging on the cell doors.)


18: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. PROCESS THEATRE

(The noise from the Keller machine now fills the room. KETTERING spins round, a look of panic on his face. The lights on and within the machine pulse on and off. KETTERING steps towards it, the look of panic on his face becoming more pronounced. He turns back to the control bank but his efforts to reach out towards it are paralyzed. He clutches his head in pain and turns back to the machine, trying to focus his eyes on it. Suddenly, the look of panic turns to one of sheer terror. As he waves his arms in a swimming motion, he seems to be surrounded by water. He gasps for breath within the mental sea that surrounds him and slowly starts to sink in its depths. As he falls to the ground, the sea of water disappears and the Keller machine falls silent...)


19: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. PROCESS THEATRE (LATER)

(KETTERING lies on a stretcher. DR. SUMMERS pulls a sheet over his face and the two medical orderlies lift the stretcher up and carry it away as the DOCTOR, JO and the GOVERNOR enter the room.)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: Dead...you know how it happened, Roland?
DR. SUMMERS: (Stunned.) I’m not sure...it’s incredible...
DOCTOR: Well, come on man, come on!
DR. SUMMERS: From the position of the body, tint of the skin...
DOCTOR: Well?
DR. SUMMERS: All the symptoms are consistent with death by drowning.
PRISONER GOVERNOR: But that’s ridiculous!
DOCTOR: Like the rats?
DR. SUMMERS: Shall I go and check on his medical record?
DOCTOR: Yes, it’s a good idea.

(SUMMERS starts to leave the room.)

DOCTOR: How long would you say he’d been dead?
DR. SUMMERS: Oh, a matter of minutes, five at the outside.

(SUMMERS leaves.)

JO: That must have been about the time the riots started.
DOCTOR: Yes, exactly.
PRISONER GOVERNOR: Are you suggesting there’s some connection?

(The DOCTOR walks, pondering, over to the Keller machine.)

DOCTOR: This machine has the power to affect men’s minds, Governor...and it’s growing stronger.
PRISONER GOVERNOR: Oh, come now, Doctor! It’s only a machine.
DOCTOR: Yes, maybe...but nevertheless it’s dangerous and it should be destroyed now!
PRISONER GOVERNOR: Well, huh! I’ve no authority to do that. I’ll report your recommendations to the Home Office but they’ll have to decide.
DOCTOR: And I wonder how many deaths it’ll take to convince them?


20: INT. CHINESE DELEGATION’S SUITE

(Another sheet is draped over another body - that of the Chinese delegate. CHIN LEE is accusatory but somewhat nervous in tone...)

CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: First theft, Brigadier. Now murder - what are you going to do about it?

(The room would be modern and comfortable but an obvious struggle has taken place. Furniture, cushions and pictures lie askew. A UNIT photographer captures the scene of the crime.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Who else knows about this?
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: No one - I called you at once.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Shall I call the police sir?
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Yes, just a courtesy call, but tell them we’ll handle this ourselves. And I want a full check on all movements in and out of this suite before Cheng Teik’s death...and no press - ‘D’ notice.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Right, sir.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: And get the Doctor back from Stangmoor, will you? I want him here.
CAPTAIN MIKE YATES: Yes sir.

(He leaves as the BRIGADIER approaches CHIN LEE.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Now then, Captain, I’d like you to tell me exactly what happened please? In detail.
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: My...appointment with the General was for twelve p.m. There was some details to discuss about the conference.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: And you were punctual?
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: I am always punctual. I showed my pass to your UNIT sentry...and entered as the clock was striking twelve.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Go on.
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: (Slightly nervous.) There is nothing more to tell. I saw the General’s body...and phoned you.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Immediately?
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: Of course.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: (After a pause.) Excuse me a moment, will you?

(He walks over to CORPORAL BELL.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Oh, Corporal Bell? I’d like you to...

(He turns and sees CHIN LEE listening intently. He lowers his voice.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: I want you to make an exact check on the time of Chin Lee’s phone call.
CORPORAL BELL: Right sir.


21: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. PROCESS THEATRE

(The GOVERNOR speaks with the DOCTOR and JO...)

PRISONER GOVERNOR: I am sorry, Doctor. That’s my final word. I’ll suspend further use of the Keller process. I’ll put this room out of bounds - but that’s all I can do, without higher authority.
DOCTOR: (With reluctance.) Yes, erm...yes all right. Well, I’d better make this machine safe.
JO: Can I help?
DOCTOR: On my own.
PRISONER GOVERNOR: Is that wise?
DOCTOR: Err, perhaps not.
JO: Well then I...
DOCTOR: (Interrupting.) But I prefer to work that way! Tell me, how long has this machine been installed?
PRISONER GOVERNOR: Nearly a year, Emil Keller came over from Switzerland to supervise the installation.
DOCTOR: I see. Did he have an assistant?
PRISONER GOVERNOR: Mmm hmm. A rather attractive Chinese girl...


22: INT. CHINESE DELEGATION’S SUITE

(CORPORAL BELL is on the phone, watched by the BRIGADIER and a very nervous CHIN LEE.)

CORPORAL BELL: (Into phone.) Yes...mmm...yes right, thank you.

(She puts down the phone and passes the BRIGADIER a note.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: Thank you.

(He reads it and approaches CHIN LEE.)

BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: You telephone me...immediately?
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: Yes...
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: No Captain, you didn’t. You telephoned me at exactly twelve-twenty four.
CAPTAIN CHIN LEE: (Nervously.) You...you must be mistaken.
BRIGADIER LETHBRIDGE STEWART: You called me on a security line. All security calls are logged. Well Captain? Why did you wait for nearly half an hour before reporting the crime?

(CHIN LEE looks evasive…)


23: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. MEDICAL WING

(In the medical wing, BARNHAM comes round. The waiting orderly sees this and goes and knocks on the door of the side room where SUMMERS is sat at a desk. He gets up and comes over to BARNHAM’S bed. JO enters the room. SUMMERS takes BARNHAM’S wrist and starts to feel his pulse.)

DR. SUMMERS: How do you feel?
BARNHAM: (Somewhat weak.) Fine...fine. Why, have I been ill?
DR. SUMMERS: Yes, but you’re all right now.
BARNHAM: Are you a Doctor?
DR. SUMMERS: Mmm hmm. Don’t you remember? I’m Doctor Summers. (Smiles.) Just try and rest. You’ll be all right.
BARNHAM: Anything you say, Doctor.

(JO and SUMMERS cross the room to where they can talk. SUMMERS starts to write on a clipboard.)

DR. SUMMERS: Well, he...seems fully recovered physically.
JO: And mentally?
DR. SUMMERS: Well, his memory’s a bit hazy but it...it’s only to be expected.
JO: And has the process harmed him?
DR. SUMMERS: (Thinks.) I...I don’t know, Miss Grant.
JO: The Doctor was wondering about Mr. Kettering’s medical history?
DR. SUMMERS: Mmm? Oh yes, I’ve got the, err, post mortem report through there.
JO: What’s the verdict?
DR. SUMMERS: Kettering’s lungs were full of water. He drowned...in the middle of a perfectly dry room.


24: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. MAIN GALLERY

(Once again, the pattern starts to repeat itself. The prisoners start to create a racket from within their cells. The OFFICERS rush round trying to restore calm. GREEN and POWERS confer but their conversation is lost in the noise of the protest.)


25: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. PROCESS THEATRE

(This time, it is the DOCTOR who is in the process theatre. As he works on the control bank, the Keller machine bursts into life. The DOCTOR puts his hand to his head and desperately tries to block out the mental confusion. He turns back to his work on the control bank.)


26: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. MAIN GALLERY

(Outside, the PRISON OFFICERS attempts to quiet the prisoners are futile.)


27: INT. STANGMOOR PRISON. PROCESS THEATRE

(The DOCTOR is desperately pulling leads from the control bank but this seems to have no effect on the Keller machine itself. His face creasing with the mental effort of battling the machine, he staggers over to it but is halted in his tracks when he sees a wall of flame in front of him. Unusually, a look of terror appears on the DOCTOR’S face and he cries out in panic as he starts to try to ward off the ever-increasing inferno...)


Next Episode


Dr. Who
JON PERTWEE

Brigadier Lethbridge Stewart
NICHOLAS COURTNEY

Jo Grant
KATY MANNING

Captain Mike Yates
RICHARD FRANKLIN

Captain Chin Lee
PIK-SEN LIM

Prison Governor
RAYMOND WESTWELL

Dr. Summers
MICHAEL SHEARD

Professor Kettering
SIMON LACK

Barnham
NEIL McCARTHY

Corporal Bell
FERNANDA MARLOW

Linwood
CLIVE SCOTT

Chief Prison Officer Powers
ROY PURCELL

Senior Prison Officer Green
ERIC MASON

Prison Officers
BILL MATTHEWS
BARRY WADE
DAVE CARTER
MARTIN GORDON

Title Music by
RON GRAINER and
BBC RADIOPHONIC
WORKSHOP

Incidental Music
DUDLEY SIMPSON

Visual Effects
JIM WARD

Costumes
BOBI BARTLETT

Make-up
JAN HARRISON

Lighting
ERIC MONK

Sound
CHICK ANTHONY

Special Sound
BRIAN HODGSON and
BBC RADIOPHONIC
WORKSHOP

Script Editor
TERRANCE DICKS

Designer
RAY LONDON

Producer
BARRY LETTS

Directed by
TIMOTHY COMBE

COLOUR

BBC 1971

 

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